Please enable javascript, or click here to visit my ecommerce web site powered by Shopify.

Indiana Glass Cooler Tumbler. A Mixed Up History, But What A Great Vase!

Sometimes I see a vintage piece and just know it can’t be left behind! That’s how I felt when I saw this Indiana Glass vessel. Amber glass is back and hot on the scene. Whether you are planning a vintage themed wedding or just want a splash of colour in your home, an amber piece like this will work overtime for you!

 

Indiana Glass Amber Tumbler

Casual warmth with mega style, and stunning as it catches the light!

Here’s a little background on this pattern.

As with so much collectible glassware, this piece comes with a mixed up history. You will see its pattern referred to as both Whitehall and American Whitehall, with the technical name for the piece itself being a ‘Cooler’. A cooler is another name for a larger sized tumbler. As mentioned, there are in fact two variations of this design. Whitehall was produced by Indiana Glass in the early 1960s – 1980s, while the other, American Whitehall, was reproduced by Lancaster Colony – formerly Fostoria, in the early 1980s onward. To add to the mish-mash of details, in 1957 Indiana Glass was purchased by Lancaster Colony but continued production under Indiana Glass. In 1963 the glassware packaging was changed to: Indiana Glass, a subsidiary of the Lancaster Colony Corporation.

It’s no wonder there is so much confusion with collectible glassware! So, how can you tell an original Indiana Glass Whitehall from a Lancaster Colony reproduction? Well, it’s in the design details. Indiana Glass’ Whitehall has a wider band at its rim that is slightly flared.

Indiana Glass 'Whitehall' Cooler

Lancaster’s American Whitehall has a narrower band and no flare, or in the case of the matching pitcher, no band at all with a jagged rim that follows the lines of each cube edge. Pretty and collectible, but not produced using the original Indiana Glass molds. Instead Lancaster’s design was produced from the Fostoria molds inherited with the purhcase of Fostoria! Are you still with me?

These pieces were created using the pressed glass method. With pressed glass, also known as mold-pressed, the design is patterned only on the exterior surface while the inside is smooth, and that’s because the interior form is separate from the exterior and then fused. Mold-pressed glass is different than mold-blown glass in that the interior of mold-blown glass matches its outer form as there is no fusing between the two. And then there’s cut glass, but I think all I’ll say about this is molded glass has a softer surface shape than cut glass. It’s easy to see the difference because cut glass has sharp angles that sparkle and prism in the light, whereas molded glass has a more rounded surface with sparkle that is not quite as brilliant. And, if you look closely you can see hairline seams where the molded sections have been joined. You can just barely see the seams on the base of this piece.

Indiana Glass Amber Tumbler

One last tidbit about this particular piece. Indiana Glass’ Whitehall is most commonly found in amber, olive green and clear – known as crystal. It was also produced in two hues of blue – light blue and teal, as well as crystal with a ruby stain, but these options are less common. Lancaster Colony produced their pieces in amber, crystal, blue and peach.

Who knew there was so much to collectible glassware, especially this cube-pressed design? Do you have vintage glassware in your collection? Any that match this piece? I’d love to hear how you incorporate and enjoy your collectibles in today’s modern lifestyle. Is mix and match your thing, or do you prefer matching all-in?

If you love this large amber tumbler, you can purchase it here from Audrey Would! Doesn’t it make a great vase?

Thanks for stopping by!

Signature 100x47 b&w

Photographs by Sheila Zeller for Audrey Would! Please link and credit if you choose to use.

A Gun Slinging Cocktail Paired With Collectible Pistol Roly Poly Glasses

On Saturdays we mix up a classic cocktail and pair it with vintage glassware from Audrey Would! It’s a lot of fun, and that’s before the cocktail has even been poured!

The cocktail we chose this time has been around for over 100 years so we decided to go with an established vintage bar glass classic, the Roly Poly. Roly Polies are great because they are made of blown glass and are rounded in shape. The base is perfectly weighted so the glass won’t tip over, and instead always lands on its feet… er, rolls onto its base!

Clear Roly Poly Bar Glass, Audrey Would!

Roly Polies come in at least three sizes, and for this cocktail we’re using the largest of the three, 3″W x 3-1/4″H. We didn’t go with the classic clear roly shown above, but instead opted for two collectible rolies featuring antique pistols. Gasp!

The first features a Pepperbox pistol from 1830.

Pepperbox Handgun Roly Poly Bar Glass,  Audrey Would!

The second, a Percussion duelling pistol from 1857.

Percussion Handgun Roly Poly Bar Glass, Audrey Would!

Note, these glasses are not faux frosted, they are actually chilled! Yes, pre-chilling your glassware is key when it comes to cocktails.

We chose these rolies for two reasons. One, we needed room for the cocktail with an oversized hand-carved cube of ice

Vintage Collectible Pistol Roly Poly Bar Glasses, Audrey Would!

And two, we wanted to feature these collectible glasses since the cocktail we chose is none other than the Whiskey Sour!

Whiskey Sour, Collectible Roly Poly Pistol Glasses, Audrey Would!

We thought this gun slinging cocktail was worthy of these very hard-to-find vintage roly poly pistol glasses. You see, the Whiskey Sour has been on the menu as far back as 1870, so even though both pistols pre-date the cocktail, we would venture a guess there has been a saloon or two where pistol wielding duals were fought!

Percussion Pistol Roly Poly Glass, Audrey Would!

If you look closely you can see where maybe, just maybe, a pistol was shot! ;-)

To learn more about the history of this thirst quenching delight… click here! Find our recipe, Cocktails by Clemens, here.

If you love these roly polies, the pair of pistol glasses is being sold with 6 clear rolies for a set of 8! Purchase here!

Vintage Roly Poly Collection, Audrey Would!

Are you a Whiskey Sour fan? Do you make yours with or without egg white?

Thanks for stopping by! Cheers :-)

Signature 100x47 b&w

Photographs by Sheila Zeller for Audrey Would! Please link and credit if you choose to use.

 

Vintage Shot Glasses – Optical Illusion: Dominos or Dice?

Awhile ago I listed this set of shot glasses and referenced the design overlay as dice.

BAR-4108-SZ Dominos Shot Glasses, Black, Gold, Anchor Hocking (x4) (2)

 

I even featured these glasses in this Polyvore set thinking of them as dice…

Show Me the Money

 

I never thought much more about it until I received this email:

Hello:

While I was browsing your site, I noticed that the “Shot Glasses, Black & Gold Dice, Anchor Hocking” should actually be labelled “Vintage Shot Glasses, Black & Gold Dominos, Anchor Hocking”.

I love your website – it was a real stroll down memory lane.  I grew up in the fifties-seventies and saw many of the barware pieces either in my parents’ home, friends’ homes, or I had considered purchasing them as wedding gifts!

I actually have my own set of Baribocraft teak salad bowls that I received as a wedding gift in 1980 and it is used regularly.

Thank you,

/pmk

 

When I went back and took another look, sure enough, the ‘dice’ were clearly domino tiles!

BAR-4108-SZ Dice Shot Glasses, Black, Gold, Anchor Hocking (x4) (1)

And now that I see the dominos I can’t believe I didn’t see them before. I think this was a case of optical illusion, one of those brain teasers where you either see the young woman or the old woman, two profiles or a goblet. You know the ones.

Isn’t it funny how this works?

I think this illustrates another important aspect to keep in mind. What one sees is not necessarily what another sees, so always be true to yourself and enjoy the things you like!

If you are looking for unique vintage barware, perhaps some Canadian vintage Baribocraft, maybe a retro wedding gift option – why not pop over to Audrey Would! and enjoy a browse through our vintage collections? We carry pieces ranging from the 1920s to 1970s with a large focus on Mid-Century Modern classics!

If you don’t see what you are looking for please contact us! We might have just the thing, but haven’t got it listed yet… and we are always happy to treasure hunt for you!

Thanks for stopping by!

Signature 100x47 b&w

Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use!

 

Easter Table Decor: Keep it Simple Tips from Audrey Would!

It’s no secret, Easter is just around the corner, and the long weekend awaits. I don’t know how your March went, but mine went fast! That’s code for needing to keep things simple and enjoy the moments that matter.

Our tip for keeping this Easter simple?

Cocktail Shaker Easter Centrepiece, Audrey Would!

Mix it up with pieces that work double time.

Here’s how:

  1. Multipurpose what you have
  2. Use a splash of colour to set the tone
    • Purple tulips for a hit of Easter colour
  3. Add a little sparkle to keep it festive
  4. Keep it functional with creative charm

Do you have a tip to add to Audrey Would!‘s list? How do you keep things simple to fully celebrate Easter and this time for renewal?

Wishing you a very Happy Easter! Thanks for stopping by!!

Signature 100x47 b&w

Please link and credit image if you choose to use!

 

Vintage Bluerina, Blue Amberina Glassware: It’s all in the Fade!

Bluerina glassware. What is it?

You will most likely have seen in passing the very popular Amberina glass, a two-toned red/amber glassware originating in the late 1800s. It was patented by Joseph Locke of the New England Glass Company as a result of others trying to copy and produce the original technique. Amberina fades from red to amber with red being at the top, amber resting at the base. Periodically you will see this fade in reverse, which is aptly called Reverse Amberina!

At Audrey Would! we have two sets of stemware from the Amberina family, but in blue rather than the original and more common red. The blue variation is known as Blue Amberina or Bluerina, and is actually considered to be one of the rarest, if not the rarest form of this formula fade.

Let’s take a look.

Blue Amberina, Bluerina Cordial Glasses, Audrey Would

Do you see how the top shade of royal blue fades and becomes a fiery amber at the base of these cordials? Stunning!

The process of creating this reactive glassware is interesting. It requires reheating the glass at the top of the piece before actually allowing the glass to cool. The glass is heat sensitive, so when it reaches a certain temperature on the reheat it begins to turn colour and transition into the fade. I mentioned earlier, Reverse Amberina, which is created by going the opposite way – reheating the base rather than the top.

Each piece, even as a set, is really unique because of the temperamental nature of reactive glass. You will see variations in the fade, some pieces featuring a very gradual ombre transformation, while others show a more distinct line between the blue top and amber base.

Blue Amberina, Bluerina Cocktail Goblets, Audrey Would!

You see that with these Bluerina cocktail goblets. Notice the difference in fade within this set? You can barely see the amber base because the fade is so tight, but trust me, it’s there! Now compare this set with the first set above. What a remarkable difference in the fading effect!

I have a theory…

These goblet bowls are 2″ deep, and the cordials are 2 3/4″ deep. That means there is an extra 3/4″ for the reactive process to ‘take fade’ in the cordial set. This of course, is my theory minus the scientific side of the process!

If you are lucky enough to find a Bluerina piece, look for the gradual fade vs. the more definite line between colours. Gradual fade is the most collectible and seeks a higher price! Also, do not limit your search to just blown glassware. This reactive glass process was used in both blown art glass and pressed glass items! Who knew?

Both of these sets are blown glass with fused stems and base.

Blue Amberina, Bluerina Cordial Glasses, Audrey Would!

Some of you might remember my earlier post featuring these cordials and Grappa with chocolate and frozen grapes! Decadent, no?

Both stemware sets seen in this post are currently available at Audrey Would! Find the cordials here, and the goblets here.

Do you have any Amberina or Blue Amberina pieces in your collection? If so, where are your pieces from?

Thanks for stopping by!

Signature 100x47 b&w

Photographs by Sheila Zeller for Audrey Would! Please link and credit if you choose to use! 

 

 

 

Vintage Double Rocks Glasses… and the Mystery Cocktail on Ice!

If you’ve been following along on Audrey Would!‘s Facebook page, Instagram, Tumblr or Twitter you will have seen the teaser posts! Yes, we were playing around with hand carved ice cubes, and we did enjoy a classic cocktail over a cube or two! You’re dying to know what that cocktail was, aren’t you?

This is a little preview of the hand carved ice cubes in the making…

Hand Carved Ice Cubes (Audrey Would!)

We boiled the water first and then froze it in a well-rinsed milk carton. Apparently boiling the water creates clear ice? Maybe next time! What we learned later is that filling a small cooler with hot water is the way to go. There’s something about the water freezing from the top down that makes perfect blocks of ice to carve from. We’ll be giving that a try!

Our ulterior motive was to feature these stunning vintage double rocks glasses paired with a classic cocktail on ice. Why? These glasses are slightly larger than your typical double rocks size, and perfect for a large, hand carved cube, or the popular round ice balls we’re enjoying these days. There’s something really fun about these big, single chunks!

Vintage Double Rocks Glass, 22k Gold Rim, Crystal

These glasses are hand blown Czechoslovakian crystal with 22k gold bands… available in a Set of 4 at Audrey Would! Notice the slight contour? This is a fantastic feature, because the contour really does make this larger rocks glass easier to hold. I love these glasses, and am feeling slightly attached!

I know I set you up with this teaser pic, so let’s not prolong the delay!

Double Rocks Glass, Hand Carved Ice , Audrey Would!

Here’s a look at this hard-to-find vintage beauty filled with the popular cocktail classic, the Negroni! Isn’t the Negroni pretty?

Negroni, Vintage Double Rocks Glass, Hand Carved Ice Cubes

The top photos feature our carved cube, and the bottom shows the round ball of ice. Notice the difference in drink level? The Negroni was measured the same for both, but the chunk of carved ice was larger. Displacement in action… and would you believe me if I told you the Negroni is considered an aperitif? It’s the truth!

I like what we have here: a classic cocktail served in a sleek vintage double rocks glass perched on a Mid-Century Atomic bar stool.

Negroni Cocktail, Audrey Would

Does it get any better than that? Find Cocktails by Clemens’ recipe here, and learn a little about the Negroni’s history here! Oh, and do you have any ice carving tips to share? We’d love a tip or two!

Thanks for stopping by!

Signature 100x47 b&w

Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use!

Vintage Indiana Glass Amber Bowl… Garland or Teardrop? What You Might Not Know!

I recently listed this amber coloured Indiana Glass compote over at Audrey Would, and wanted to address a little confusion that surrounds this popular pressed glass piece.

Indiana Glass, Garland, Amber Compote (1)

There were two variations of the scalloped-rim design produced in a range of colours. This amber option is referred to as ‘Garland’. The other design is commonly known as ‘Teardrop’ and it features single droplets opposed to these clusters of three.  The interesting thing is neither one, Garland or Teardrop, represent the actual patterns Indiana Glass produced between 1940 and 1970 by those names, and yet Indiana glass marketed this piece by the pattern names! Confusion.

And just to add to the confusion… this stand-alone piece was also marketed as the ‘Decorator Bowl’ and sold at home parties by Tiara… back in the day! Simply put, this bowl was made to be decorative and is in name-only part of either pattern line. Further, it’s understandable why there’s this much confusion, because the packaging says so! If you are lucky enough to find this piece with its original box, you will see ‘Garland’ right on the box itself. Why wouldn’t you think that was the pattern name?

Just for fun, here are a few mock-ups featuring how versatile this decorator bowl with its history is!

 Vintage Indiana Glass 'Decorator Bowl'

 

Interested in this Indiana Glass piece? Click here to purchase from Audrey Would!
Thanks for stopping by!
Signature 100x47 b&w
Photographs by Sheila Zeller for Audrey Would. Please link and credit if you choose to use!

Mr. J. Donald Burke, Burke & Wallace Silversmiths, Canadian Vintage

Celebrating Mr. J. Donald Burke, and sharing this post with gratitude…

Some of you might remember this pair of vintage silver goblets I featured over at Audrey Would! A beautiful boxed set nestled in turquoise satin by silversmiths, Burke and Wallace.

Burke & Wallace Silver Plated Goblets, Boxed Set

Today it is my privilege and honour to share a little history about Mr. J. Donald Burke, written and provided to me by Mr. Burke’s daughter, Shirley Imbeau.

But first, do you recognize this 36″ high, 35 pound silver goblet in the hands of J. Donald Burke? Yes, the Stanley Cup is very much a part of Mr. Burke’s story!

J. Donald Burke (1963), Stanley CupJ. Donald Burke, 1963 (Photo courtesy of Shirley Imbeau)

A glimpse into the life of J. Donald Burke as written and shared by daughter, Shirley Imbeau:

J. Donald Burke  was born in a small town, Trenton, Ontario, Canada in 1922.  His father died when he was twelve and being the oldest son in a family of 5 children, he left school with a 7th grade education, and started working to support the family at a silver manufacturing plant, Benedict Proctor and Sons. He started in the cleaning department, and learned to love and understand the silver business.

He had mastoid surgery in 1942 and completely lost his hearing in one ear so was unable to fight in the war, but moved to Toronto and set up a silver repair business.  He was able to get financing from Mr. Wallace (unrelated to Wallace Sterling) and Burke and Wallace became a silver manufacturing company in Toronto.  With amazing people skills, a gift he has always used for God, and with what my mother always referred to as ‘know how’, he grew the business until it was the largest in Canada until he sold it in 1986 and it was subsequently and very sadly closed down.

He made silver under many trademarks; I still don’t recognize them all!  For many years he repaired the Stanley Cup, added rings, and made individual cups for the players of the winning teams.  In 1963 it was decided that the cup was becoming too brittle to be enjoyed by the winning teams and he made an exact replica. On Nov 4, 2014, the Keepers of the Cup, Phil Pritchard and Craig Campbell brought the cup for a special visit to the retirement home where my father now lives.

J. Donald Burke, 2014, Stanley CupJ. Donald Burke, 2014 (Photo courtesy of Shirley Imbeau)

Such a privileged glimpse into an amazing man’s story! I’m sad too, that Burke & Wallace no longer exists, and am grateful to have come across these goblets, grateful for what transpired next.

And what did transpire? How does all of this tie together with Audrey Would? Some of you might remember this Facebook post from January…

Burke & Wallace Goblets

Wouldn’t you agree, this is a truly beautiful goblet set?

And now, here is where the goblets have ended up…

We are so delighted to have the wine goblets, and my son Andrew who adores his grandfather and found them on your website, is now the proud owner.

[Shirley Imbeau] 

I have always believed it’s in the stories where each piece comes to life, and these goblets definitely have a life! They have certainly travelled a journey to find their way home.
Thank you Shirley, for taking the time to share a little of your father’s story!
Signature 100x47 b&w
Photographs by Sheila Zeller unless otherwise indicated. Please link and credit if you choose to use. As a courtesy, please do not republish the images of Mr. J. Donald Burke without the consent of Shirley Imbeau.

Cheers! Bittersweet, but I’m So Okay!

When sourcing pieces for Audrey Would! my eye is typically taken to items I like. In retail that’s not always best practice, but with this vintage niche I find it generally works for me.

Awhile ago I featured this pretty amazing statement piece.

Towle SP Punch Bowl 650

It’s a silver plated punch bowl by Towle, and I know not everyone is in the market for a piece like this, but I thought it would be fun to share a few different ways this punch bowl can be put to use.

After all, we do have the wedding season coming up! That means stagettes, bridal showers… you know how it goes!

Some of you might remember, I sourced this bowl along with another option for a customer by request. In the end the other piece was chosen, so this punch bowl became part of the Audrey Would! collection.

At our Holiday Shopping Event I featured the Towle punch bowl with a mix-and-match selection of silver plated goblets and coupes.

Silver Plate Punch Bowl

This bowl as a punch set originally came with little handled cups. Sweet, but I have to say, I do like the mix-and-match approach. It turns ‘sweet’ into ‘fun’!

And…

When we were in San Francisco I fell in love with the way Bix Restaurant put a similiar silver punch bowl to use.

Silver Punch Bowl, Martini Glasses on Ice

Don’t mind the grainy phone pic. I just wanted you to see the martini glasses chillin’ on finely crushed ice! Isn’t this great?

And then…

On New Years Eve the Towle bowl was test-run for a similar use, but to chill Prosecco on cubed ice instead!

New Years Eve

You see, we opted in on a Jamie Oliver suggestion. He-hem… as Jamies toutes it, ‘Pimped-up Prosecco‘. So all the vintage pitchers you see actually hold fresh juices to go with the Prosecco.

Blood Oranges

Another grainy phone pic, but yes, it really was ‘that’ good!

After seeing the range this great piece double-duties for, would you hold it against me if I said I was feeling bittersweet about its sale and departure? No, not me either! I am thrilled this fantastic vintage piece has found a new home!

Just think, the possibilities are endless!

Do you have any vintage pieces that stand in for other uses? Please share… heck, please send pics! Why not? The creativity of one expands the opportunities for another!

Thanks for stopping by!

Signature 100x47 b&w

Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use!

 

 

Vintage Bar Tool: 1940s Trap Jigger by Fay

It’s no secret, we have our own bar cart and are having fun learning the art of cocktail mixing. But did you know that after a day of treasure hunting, my Mr. always gets first dibs on the barware pieces I’ve managed to find?

We-ell…

About 2 weeks ago this little jigger made its way through our door, and will be staying in our home collection.

1940s Trap Jigger by Fad, Audrey Would!

This piece is a 1940s Trap Jigger by Fay, made in Japan. It’s a 3/4 oz measure, and the way it works is to rest the Bakelite knobs on the rim of the glass (don’t let go of the jigger!), press down and a trap opens up to release the spirit you’ve measured out!

1940s Trap Jigger by Fay, Audrey Would!

When it comes to cocktail mixing it’s all about the details. When it comes to vintage barware, it’s all about design!

Thanks for stopping by!

Signature 100x47 b&w

Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use!