Annie Sloan Follow-Up: Mini Take-Home Project

Remember my mini project from the Annie Sloan chalk paint workshop the other day? The one I couldn’t quite finish because the paint hadn’t fully dried? If you missed that post you can read about it here.

Anyway, I was given a faux wood tray made of hard plastic to paint, and then distress. But I couldn’t do the distressing part with the paint still tacky, so that’s what was left for me to do at home.

I didn’t get a ‘before’ photo of the tray, but it was somewhat similar to this one.

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Remember, this is faux wood.

Here is the actual tray with it’s coat of paint.

I opted to go with ASCP ‘Aubusson Blue’.

This is the paint chip colour from the Annie Sloan website.

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And we all know how colours vary when they’re on the computer…

But did you know Aubusson Blue was named after the grey blue found in classic 18th and 19th century Aubusson rugs from France? And that it’s also a traditional Swedish farmhouse colour? I find the stories behind the colour names as fascinating as the colours themselves.

To distress the tray I went with the water and scrubby method instead of scuffing it with sandpaper.

Here are the first few scuffs.

I wanted to go easy to get the feel of it.

I know one of the bonuses with this paint is how easy it is to touch up ambitious distress marks…

Like some of the ones you see here. Oops. I think because this is plastic and not wood, the paint peeled rather than scuffed when I used a little too much pressure. Oh well, I’ll get the hang of it. But for now I don’t have this paint, so I can’t fix those spots.

So I moved on to the clear wax to protect the paint, and give the tray a more finished look.

 

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But I used a dry cloth to rub the wax on to the tray, not a brush.

Gives it a little bit of shine, but not too much.

So, the tray went from this…

To this.

What do you think?

Who knows, I might touch the tray up in time… once I have my own paint. But for now I have given the paint a test run, and with this mini project have a little something to look back on.

I’m looking forward to my bigger project, but have to discipline myself to finish up a few waiting in line before moving on to that one.

How about you? Got any projects on the go? Any you are dying to tackle, too?

It’s about coming home… If you want a remarkable space that tells your story, contact me to see how we can help!

THANKS FOR READING!

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15 Replies to “Annie Sloan Follow-Up: Mini Take-Home Project”

    1. Thank you Luciane! I am more and more inspired everyday to try new DIY ideas. It’s just amazing the things that can be done. Who knew a plastic tray could look like a well worn wooden piece?

  1. This came out great Sheila! You sure caught on pretty fast- looks so good. I love using Anne Sloane paint- want to experiment more with it! You have given me more incentive to begin!

    1. Thanks Kelly! I haven’t bought any of the paint yet, but I think I’m going to start with the Paris Grey and the Aubusson Blue. I have some new ideas for the piece in our bedroom… now I just need to take the plunge. I have a hunch that once I leap, I’m going to become a little addicted!

  2. The tray loos great Sheila. I love the color you choose. Funny thing that I read this this morning because I am heading out today to buy some Annie Sloan paint as I am about to tackle a big make over myself this weekend…stay tuned!

    1. Thanks Linda! The colour is really pretty – it’s quite slatey – a dirty undertone compared to Greek Blue or Napoleonic Blue, but not in a bad way. Apparently it works really well with Paris Grey… so I’m rethinking my plan for the piece in our bedroom. Can’t wait to see what you have in store to show us next… your pieces are amazing. Now that I have a better idea what’s behind the whole process, I am doubly in awe!

  3. Hey Sheila
    That looks great! I love the color too. As for projects for me ……. there are several I want to tackle but the editing seems to keep me busy. How about I try to make time. This snow makes me want to start them!!

    1. I can’t even imagine how much time your editing takes! I know how much time it takes just for my blog, so as a profession it must demand a huge chunk of your time… snow days are so great for getting inspired to start a project. It’s like this silent permission to stay cozy and warm, puttering away on something new! Hope you get to tackle one of your projects 🙂

  4. Your tray is fantastic Sheila. I have just painted a credenza with Aubuson Blue and then I waxed it and I”m so not happy with it. It’s my first furniture fail. I’m going to try and rewax but the wax looks uneven and not the beautiful, soft finish I’m used to getting after regular paint.

    1. Thank you! I haven’t tackled anything with it yet, but this is something for me to pay attention to. All we learned about the waxing was to put it on and rub the excess off working in small areas from one side to the other so the wax doesn’t dry too fast – seemed pretty standard. Leave a big piece 24 hours before a 2nd waxing. Also there’s a large round waxing brush the instructor really liked for larger pieces, but I didn’t try it, I only worked with the smaller brush. Apparently the 2nd waxing will give it more shine, and level it out… Let me know how it goes. Oh, I hope it works. The thought of a furniture fail intimidates me coming from a veteran like you!

  5. I am loving this new paint line! As you know already, I LOVE chalkboard paint and with all the fabulous colours the possibilities are endless as you have shown. That is a gorgeous tray Sheila, what an amazing project and job you did! I do have to say though…is it wrong that I prefer it not distressed?

    1. Hi Shelley!
      So awesome to see you here 🙂 Thanks! Your comment made me laugh… I like your honest feedback, and there’s nothing wrong about it. Without preferences our world would be just way to Vanilla!

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