Happy Earth Day… Where Are You Walking?

Today in honor of Earth Day I thought I would share a photo from our recent Seattle trip. Love these little pig brass hoof steps!

2014 - Earth Day - April 22

Let’s join the pigeon, and follow in the steps of the pig… why not walk instead of drive today in honor Earth Day. Heck, why not walk every day that we can?

Happy Earth Day! Thanks for stopping by!!

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Photograph by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use! :-)

Votive Holder Becomes a Vase!

I’ve had this pretty cool set of  chunky glass votive holders for quite a few years now, but have stopped using them. In fact, I even set them aside to donate with my next thrifting purge.

Chunky Glass Votive Holder

I still actually quite like them, but you know how it is. Sometimes you just move on.

And I really had moved on… until I brought home a bunch of tulips the other day. I have vases, but I was feeling restless, and wanted a change.

For some reason these votive holders came to mind, and then it all fell into place.

Chunky Glass Votive Holder turned Vase

Sometimes it pays to think outside of the box!

Tulip Collage

An unexpected bonus – the inverted dip for the votive became a great stabilizer for holding the tulips upright and in place!

Tulips in Votive Holder

I have decided to keep them after all. Whether or not they’ll see candles again is hard to say, but I know they’ll see tulips again soon… I have three of these chunky vessels and I think a trio for Easter might be kind of nice!

How about you? Have you given something a new purpose lately? If so, what did you do?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller; Please link and credit if you choose to use! :-)

DIY Modernist Vase: Inspired by West Germany Matte White Porcelain c. 1960s

So you love Mid-Century vases – modernist – matte white porcelain, Kaiser, made in Germany circa 1960s. Are you okay with the ‘look for less’ concept? I am. You know I love my authentic MCM pieces, but I couldn’t resist this DIY temptation any longer!

I bought this vase a million years ago when Superstore was a new phenomenon and I was enamored with a $7.00 price tag.

Faux MCM Vase - Before

I never really loved the colour, but at the time it fit my decor. Shhhhh, hush with the gasps!

Well, all that has changed. My less-than-a-look has turned into a look-for-less by using up part cans of spray paint, first a primer and then a gloss.

Faux MCM Vase - In Progress Collage

If I wasn’t using up paint I had on hand I probably would have opted for matte instead of gloss, but in the end the high gloss isn’t so bad.

Faux MCM Vase - After

What do you think?

This is how the transformation looks from all sides…

Faux MCM Vase - After - All Sides Collage

Gallery style.

And from a distance in context…

Faux MCM Vase - In Context

I didn’t go out and buy anything for this makeover, and it took me about an hour from start to finish – most of that time was spent ‘watching the paint dry’ as they say!

I know the lines may not be exactly classic Mid-Century, but I’m okay with that for this faux variation.

How about you? What knockoffs have you DIYed lately?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use! :-)

Fratelli Reguitti: Sometimes Major Changes Are Just Small Tweaks!

You might have seen this little teaser from the weekend…

Fratelli RegiuttiAre you wondering what it is?

This piece is not major in terms of its size or even addition to the actual decor, but it is a major piece when it comes down to function and feelin’ the love!

It is designed for, and destined to take care of scenarios like this… gotta love those cords!

Before the Valet (2a)

Anyone else out there appreciate? No, honey, I’m not throwing you under the bus! ;-)

You see, I am partly responsible…

A few years back in a moment of empathetic male camaraderie,  my Dad handed over his clothing valet to hubs. But somehow it ended up becoming a place to hang my grandmother’s quilt, and well, a DIY project for me! Hehem…

So lately I’ve sort of been keeping my eyes open for a replacement valet while on my treasure hunting rounds, and finally last week this 1950s Fratelli Regiutti option appeared!

Fratelli Regiutti Gentleman's Valet

Fratelli Regiutti, an Italian designer behind some well known 1950s furniture pieces including this gentleman’s valet, and variations of it. Don’t you love that, a gentleman’s valet? They were originally made to hang up suits. You can see from the teaser pic, how well made Regiutti valets are. All I really had to do was give this piece a wash-down, clean up the brass shoe rails, and wax the wood. This piece is not at risk of a makeover… for now.

Once in place, this is what happened to hub’s corner of the lair…

Fratelli Regiutti Gentleman's Valet

Yes, the boxes were hidden underneath! And, I promised not to ‘borrow’ this valet for any other use!

What small tweaks have you made that impact major change? Have you ever heard of Fratelli Reguitti? What do you think of his gentleman’s valet?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use! :-)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s Tumble Up for Saint Patrick’s Day!

Green happens to be one of my favorite colours, and for that reason I especially like Saint Patrick’s Day! Today, in light of Saint Paddy’s Day, I’m featuring this sweet green Art Deco piece from the Audrey Would! collection, and will show you how our modern Audrey might use it today!

This piece was made by the Dunbar Glass Co. out of West Virginia in the early 1930s-40s, and was called a  tumble up set. The small glass, known as the tumble, doubled as the lid. Today these sets are commonly referred to as bedside water carafes, and a hotel I recently stayed in actually had a set very similar to this one on each side of the bed!

Dunbar Glass Co - Green Glass Tumble Up Set

Dunbar Glass Co. was in business for 40 years, between 1913 and 1953. They began making household glassware in the 1920s; sadly the factory was later destroyed by fire, and as a result Dunbar glassware pieces are harder-to-find collectibles. This green tumble up set is one of Dunbar’s later pieces, but because of the fire is actually quite rare.

However, the more common tumble up sets were produced mainly in the 1930s and were typically made of pink Depression glass. These pink carafes usually had ridges around the body and base, with the tumbles matching the ridges in their design, like the set below.

Dunbar Glass Pink Tumble Up Set

{Source}

The design was later modified as you can see here in the green set.

Art Deco Dunbar Glass Bedside Water Carafe - Green

Notice there are no ridges at the base of the carafe, they are around its neck instead, and the tumble is without ridges at all. The newer carafes also had a pouring lip shaped into their rim. But the key design modification was in how the tumble fit the carafe as a lid. In the earlier sets the tumble fit over the outside of the carafe’s neck, but with this carafe you can see the tumble fits inside. A definite improvement in the design, because the tumble could be replaced after use and the water would not roll down the outside! If you look back at the pink carafe notice the difference in the rim and the tumble lid?

I can see how useful a tumble up set might be for its intended purpose, but how about modern Audrey? How do you think she might use this Art Deco piece today?

This is what I see…

Dunbar Glass Co - Green Tumble Up Set

Yes, I think this little tumble up set would be perfect at a desk. In today’s modern world we spend a lot of time at our desks whether on the job or at home, and staying hydrated is key.

But we also have modern technology that doesn’t play well with water as a contact sport!

Dunbar Glass Co - Green Tumble Up Set

I think our modern Audrey can have both. She can have her technology and water at her fingertips, too. All she needs is a tumble up set like this!

Dunbar Glass Co - Green Tumble Up Set

What do you think? Is this something you might choose to use in your desktop routine? See listing details here for this vintage Dunbar tumble up!

And if you missed Audrey’s collection dedicated to all things green, here is another look…

Audrey Would! - Green Collection

May the luck of the Irish be with you!

Happy Saint Patrick’s Day, and thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller unless otherwise indicated. Please credit and link if you choose to use! :-)

 

Multi-purposing Ombre Barware: Transitioning Flowers from Morning to Night!

Vintage barware can be so much more than meets the eye – you just have to see it with a different eye! Here I take an everyday floral bouquet, and present it in a bouquet of vintage ombre vessels showing you how to multi-purpose the barware, and transition flowers from morning to night!

These are the ombre vessels I started with…

Vintage Silver Ombre Carafes & PitchersFrom L-R, a 1950-60s Vitreon Queens Lustreware carafe, Libbey carafe and Vitreon Queens cocktail pitcher.

I also selected an embossed ombre roly poly (below). This roly has a lot of its ombre worn off around the embossed pattern, so it’s become a spare in the Audrey collection – not for sale, but too pretty to ignore. The everyday bouquet you see is a simple mix of flowers in deep reds and white. To honour this coming Saint Patrick’s Day I picked up a pot of Irish Moss and some extra filler in bright pops of green!

Embossed Ombre Roly Poly

I’ve put my own spin on a current and popular  trend to group different but similar vases together with the same type of flower. See more of the latest trends over at ProFlowers blog here! Instead of staying with the same flower, it’s the mercury fade (ombre) that I’m highlighting as the common theme. My twist is taking the every day bouquet from a daytime setting to an evening presentation!

Ombre Barware as Vases

These mini brandy snifters are more seconds in Audrey’s mix, but I refuse to say, all is lost. I opted to incorporate candles into this theme and decided to use them for tealight holders instead! Pairing candlelight with the ombre’s reflective surface was simply a natural fit.

By planting the Irish Moss in the roly poly, I was able to camouflage the worn ombre, and give this vintage glass new life.

Embossed Ombre Roly Poly as a Planter

The flicker of candlelight made the embossed pattern come alive.

Embossed Ombre Roly Poly in Candlelight

To reinforce the silver reflective theme, I’ve set the roly on a 1960s Park Sherman crystal coaster with a silver plated rim, and the tealights on Kimiko mercury glass coasters.

And to pull everything together the arrangement of flowers, candles and coasters have been set out on a vintage Canadian ‘Silhouette Quality’ tin tray with a leaf pattern that reinforces the cut stems and greenery.

Ombre Vessels in Flower Arrangements

I’ve set the tray on layered linen tea towels to warm and soften the feel of the cool, reflective surfaces, to define the overall presentation, and to pull together the colour scheme. The tea towels are what make this presentation work by day, giving it a cheery, relaxed feel.

I’ve kept the floral presentation more casual by adding Bear Grass, allowing it to whisp freely and umbrella the tray.

Vintage Canadian 'Silhouette Quality' Tin Tray

It’s the deep coloured flowers, the candles and reflective surfaces of the sleek, elegant ombre that make this presentation work by night!

Silver Ombre Vessels as Vases

Do you notice how the linen tea towels blend and almost fade away? If you really want to change the feel for the evening, just lift the tray and remove the tea towels – it’s that simple!

A recap of tips:

  • utilize vessels beyond their intended purpose – here it was vintage barware
  • pick your common theme and run with it – in this case, vintage pieces with reflective surfaces, candlelight, and deep red flowers
  • draw the eye into the whole scene – I did this by using similar but not identical pieces positioned at varying heights
  • integrate layering and texture – I layered the main vessels onto the tray and coasters, and brought the whole presentation together by placing it on the layered tea towels
  • group and run the odds – the larger vessels are grouped together, the candles and coasters placed out front, and I’ve used odd numbers of like things
  • think subtle reinforcements – here, the connection of colour in the flowers to the tea towels, reflective surfaces of the pieces to the flickering of candlelight, leaf pattern on the tray to cut stems and greenery – all work together to reinforce the overall presentation.

Vintage Silver Ombre Barware as Vases

At this time of year you can lighten things up with pretty pinks and yellows, purples and whites, but I like the drama of deep red against the silver tones in these vintage barware pieces… even though I know Audrey Would ‘think pink’!

What floral presentations are you noticing and loving these days? What items have you seen multi-purposed to stand in for vases instead?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please credit and link if you choose to use! :-)

 

 

Mixing DIY and Vintage Glam for a Modern Vintage Look

The much anticipated VintAGEous Fair in Victoria has come and gone. It was a lot of fun and a successful day with a huge thank you to Sarah Rempel for her stellar organizing of the event, and to all the customers who stopped by!

In prepping for an event like this there is a lot of work that goes on behind the scenes, and for me one of the things I focus on is presentation. How am I going to maximize my space, feature a variety of pieces AND keep them safely on display? This time around I decided to have some fun juxtaposing a rustic vintage look with the vintage glam of Audrey Would! Do you remember these pallets I posted on Facebook and Instagram?

Pallets

A super big thank you goes out to Leigh Davies for parting with them! Leigh had a plan for the pallets, but passed them on to me instead putting her own project on hold! I’m guessing the pallets had something to do with Mid-Island Ink Depot,  ’the’ place to buy toner cartridges in the Cowichan Valley! Leigh is ‘Mrs. Ink’ in the mix of Chris and Leigh, Chris of course being Mr. Ink!

So the pallets…

I asked my Dad to turn them into rustic crates. My idea was to pack them with inventory selected for the fair, and then use them to display the pieces. When you’re in a limited footprint it’s important to utilize your vertical space, and in this case my footprint was a 6′ table, so I had to create my own verticle!

These are the first four crates. My Dad’s neighbour, Bryan came up with a few more pallets and that was enough for me to end up with seven crates!

DIY Crates from Pallets

I wanted reasonable gaps between each slat to allow a little light in. With presentation in mind I also toyed with giving each crate a sanding and watered down staining for a more weathered look, but decided to leave that for another time!

When I’m pulling inventory for a fair I always do a test-run set-up. I find this really helps me narrow down the pieces and once there, makes set-up go quickly and smoothly. In this case, because the crates are made with pallets, I had to figure out which ones ‘fit’ best together. They’re all ‘roughly’ the same, but some slats are a bit warped, others not perfectly square.

Here’s a little look at my ‘Operation Basement’ test-run! This is an 8′ table, so I’ve taped it off at 6′. The pieces off to the side are back-up pieces I selected to replace items as they sold.

Test-run Table Set-Up - VintAGEous Fair

Like any behind-the-scenes, you can see there’s a lot less glamour than meets the public eye! I think that’s part of the challenge – to envision each display regardless of its surroundings. At the fairs you have no control over the backdrop, so all you can do is focus on your own display.

Another thing I try to do is put out a good selection while still keeping it presented. Less is more as a general rule of thumb, but for fairs I pack more into the space than I normally would. I try to layer the pieces down and bring them out while staying focused on theme, visual interest and overall flow. I place sparkly pieces where they will catch and bounce the light, and with this display my hope was the pieces out front would draw the eye to what was displayed in the crates.

Display Collage

Remember I said you have no control over the backdrop of your space?

Display Set-Up - VintAGEous Fair

In this case my table was set up in the daycare area of the Fernwood Community Centre!

Another part of my presentation is to draw the eye up, and with this display I featured larger pieces with chrome, and stood a crystal tray behind the glasses for sparkle en mass! This is where having a sign also really helps!

Display Set-Up - VintAGEous Fair

Behind the sloped trim is actually an access ramp to the area, which worked well for where my table was placed. Everyone coming down the ramp was able to see my table, and I hope the shiny sign and sparkle of the pieces helped catch their eye!

Since the Oscars were hot on the heels of the fair, and by now you all know the inspiration behind ‘Audrey’, this was my center display.

Disply - Center Section - VintAGEous Fair

Audrey Hepburn with her Oscar for the leading role in Roman Holiday, her first Hollywood movie and first leading role! I featured the tall clear decanter with this display, because it reminded me of the Oscar Audrey is holding! Here Audrey is attending the 54th Oscars.

In keeping with the theme, this year we watched the 86th Oscars at home in vintage Audrey Would! style…

Audrey Would! - Vintage Pieces - 86th Oscars

  • Northern Divine caviar served in a classic bamboo stemmed coupe;
  • Prosecco in sleek vintage Czechoslovakian crystal coupes; and
  • Ceasar salad in the vintage Baribocraft bowls I featured here and here.

Simple and elegant at-home-chic. So much fun! There is something to be said for classic vintage, don’t you think?

If you weren’t able to attend the VintAGEous Fair, you will find many of the pieces I had there over at Audrey Would! I am working on listing more pieces for you to see, so  don’t hesitate to contact me if you are looking for something special, or saw a treasure you wished you’d picked up. I am always happy to help!

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please credit and link if you choose to use!

Taking Glo-Hill to the Oscars!

The 86th Oscars are coming… this Sunday! Are you ready to party, are you hosting a party… or both? If you are hosting, then it’s time for some sparkle and shine. Get ready to glam things up with classic white linen, dashes of black for that black tie appeal, and for heaven’s sake be sure to use sleek vintage barware with all the accessories!

Now that we’ve got that sorted out…

Audrey Would! has a brand new collection of sleek, shiny and very Mid-Century pieces fit for the red carpet eve. Many of you will recognize them, some of you will have grown up with them, and a few of you might even have a piece or three!

I, myself feel very lucky to have a few pieces my Auntie Sharon has passed on to me. She tells me they were wedding gifts -my aunt and uncle are celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary this year- and you know how I feel about the stories behind the treasures!

This is the first piece. Isn’t it exquisite? The cut glass insert is heavy, and sparkles as it catches the light, but how about those Atomic-style feet?

Glo-Hill Serving Tray, 5-Section Cut Glass Insert, Red Cherry Bakelite

The oval insert is removable making clean-up easy, and the tray itself very multi-functional. This is how I used the tray for Christmas dinner…

Glo-Hill Tray - Multi-purposed

The ice block was so pretty, it was almost a shame to cover it up, but the tray worked perfectly for presentation and catching the water as the ice began to melt!

This second piece matches the first. That’s one of the things I like so much about Glo-Hill – you can never go wrong because all of their pieces are easy to mix and match.

Glo-Hill Flat Bottom Serving Dish

I love the off-set Bakelite handles, the common denominator of these two pieces, and I really like the flat bottom style. Most pieces in the Gourmates line have the Atomic feet or the all-in-one bridge style. You’ll see a few pieces with the bridge style in our collection, and we just happen to have a few more pieces like these as well!

Do you see why Glo-Hill is the perfect serving ware for a red carpet/black tie affair? This is just a snapshot of what you can expect to find in our Glo-Hill Collection, and our collection is only getting started. There is so much more to Glo-Hill, so many pieces to find!

A quick bit of history…

Glo-Hill Corporation, originally known as Glo-Hill Company was an innovative serving ware company out of Montreal that specialized in sleek chrome pieces with Bakelite accents and modern lines. The company was started in 1945 by Jack Globus and Harry Hill, soon after to be joined by Jack’s brothers, Leo and Saul. It was then the company became known as simply, ‘Glo-Hill’. Glo-Hill, was a prestigious company, its elegant Mid-Century pieces sought after by many and refused by few until closing its doors in 1979. Glo-Hill left its footprint in the Mid-Century era, and imprinted its soul in Canadian history!

Many of the pieces we offer at Audrey Would! still have their sticker intact, but even without the sticker, you will see there is no mistaking Glo-Hill! If you are hosting a Soiree and ‘need’ a Glo-Hill piece visit our collection here. If you ‘need’ one for the Oscars, Audrey Would! will be at the VintAGEous Fair in Victoria this Saturday….

VintAGEous Fair 2014

Contact me by Thursday and I’ll be sure to bring the Glo-Hill piece along for you to see first-hand!

Do you have any Glo-Hill pieces of your own? Do you know the stories behind them?

See you at the Fair!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use!  :-)

Modern Audrey: Today’s Use for the Vintage Murano Glass Ashtray!

Murano glass is incredibly beautiful, and in its vintage day was often made into ashtrays. But with the glamour days of Lucky Strike long gone, the ashtray has been removed from pride of place in the home, and more often than not, stashed in a cupboard or thoughtlessly tossed away. I say, what a shame! What a shame to lose sight of the beauty within the object.

Murano glass is thick and masterfully crafted, the layers of colour so pretty…

Green Swirl Murano Glass Ashtray 1

I love the way light dances, bounces and sparkles as it brings exquisite pieces to life.

Green Swirl Murano Glass Ashtray 2

A flower bowl is just one way to transition vintage Murano art glass ashtrays into modern times. Other uses – a dip bowl, candy or nut dish, paperclip dish, kitchen scrubbie container, and if you’re gentle, it’s even great for a set of keys. They say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks, but Audrey Would! says you can! Find more details on this vintage beauty here.

How would you use this piece?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use! :-)

 

Iconic Jascha Brojdo… Georges Briard

This is an article re-post originally written for Audrey Would! back in August 2013. Now that Audrey related blog posts are featured here, I wanted to re-share, because I love the story behind this Mid-Century great, and his ornately detailed pieces.

You know a notable designer when you see one – that is, when you search for a photograph of him, and all that comes up, image after image, is his amazing work!

Jascha Brojdo. Do you know who I’m talking about?

Photograph of Georges Briard - Anthology House

{Source: Anthologie House}

That’s right. Georges Briard!

Georges Briard was born in the Ukraine in 1917 under the birth name of Jascha Brojdo. At the age of 20 he made his way from Poland to Chicago where he earned his Master of Fine Arts (MFA) at the Art Institute of Chicago. Do you know he also studied at the University of Chicago?

Jascha, being fluent in several languages, also served for the US Army in WWII as a Russian translator. He was discharged in 1947, and that’s when his life took on the shape we now connect him to.

A known, or maybe lesser know fact, Georges was an artist first, a designer second, which was ultimately instrumental in his use of Brojdo vs. Briard. But first, how did Georges Briard even come to be? How did he get that name from Jascha Brojdo?

After Jascha was discharged from the army, by the 1950s he had started working in New York with Max Willie whom he met in art school. Jascha first hand painted blank trays, which quickly became a huge success. These trays were initially signed with ‘Brojdo’, but because they were such a success, Willie came up with a pseudonym to mark Brojdo’s commercial pieces, and save his personal last name for his paintings. This is when Georges Briard was born!

How the actual name, Georges Briard, was chosen is mildly amusing. Willie liked ‘Georges’ simply because it sounded very ‘French’, and Briard after the breed of dog he [Willie] had recently lost! No, we’re not making this up!

Georges Briard became most well known through the 1950s, 60s and 70s for his signature dishware and glassware, from basic pieces to gold plated serving dishes. He was behind some of the decorated pieces of companies like Libbey and Anchor Hocking, as he would buy them clear, add his artistry and sign off with his finishing touch.

Georges Briard was also known for his ornate barware pieces like you see here.

Briard Pieces

I am of course swooning, and so excited to currently have this collection available at Audrey Would! {Bar Tools} {Gold Filigree Ice Bucket} {Gold Filigree Highball Glasses}

Though he never did officially change his name, in spite of how or where Jascha Brojdo’s designer name came from, the bottom line is the 22k gold signature we have all come to know was, and still is his brand.

Georges Briard Gold Ice Bucket - 22k Gold Signature 

Jascha Brojdo died on July 30, 2005… Georges Briard lives on today!

I am happy to raise a glass in celebration of Jascha Brojdo yesterday, Georges Briard today. Will you join me?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller unless otherwise indicated. Please link and credit if you choose to use! :-)