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A Vintage Home With A Vintage View!

I thought now would be a good time to take a small pause and share our news.

Soon we will be moving to a vintage home with a vintage view!

Mount Baker View

The story behind this area is fun and fascinating. It involves rum runners between here and the US during the prohibition years, a look out point, a cove that housed a dynamite factory in the late 19th century… and now a beautiful rural-feeling area shrouded in trees with the heart of the City just a stone’s throw away. The streets are quiet and narrow, more like a lane, and only lit by 2 lamp posts the entire way!

Welcome to where we will soon call home.

Welcome Home

We knew in an instant it was calling our name.

There are many original features still in place…

Living Room

We love the hardwood, the old heat-vent grate, the cove ceiling corners tucked here and there, and the addition of this stand-up bar in a Mid-Century way!

Dining Room

We will have two decks to enjoy, one up that gets full sun and takes in the view, and this lower one that steps out to the private back yard and is more shaded for the hot summer days.

Back Yard

We will have new neighbours, and some we didn’t expect to meet… the kind that borrow your yard to eat!

Neighbourly Pets

Life has its way of making changes come along. We are sad to be leaving our current community and all that it has brought to our life, but we are grateful that we will only be a short drive away.

We look forward to carrying on with our Saturday Cocktails by Clemens served in Audrey Would! wares, sitting up to the MCM bar and being immersed in our ‘new’ character laden vintage setting.

Bamboo Cocktail by Clemens

If you have noticed fewer posts here or fewer new listings over at Audrey Would!, just know that right now we are neck-deep in purging and packing, and sorting our things… and prepping for our July 4th garage sale – 6283 Selkirk Terrace, Duncan – 9:30 to 2:00…ish! Yes, there will be 2 sweet, need-to-be-restored Mid-Century dressers in the mix that I ran out of time to fix!

Though we are moving it is not goodbye, it is another step in the journey…

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use!

Vintage Tantalus Sets: Keep Your Spirits Under Lock & Key!

Tantalus. What in the world is that?

The tantalus is a late-19th century introduction to keeping your liquor under lock and key. Liquor stored in decanter bottles was kept safe by the locking tantalus frame that held decanter bottles inside. The frame was designed in such a way that while it was an open caddy for displaying elegant decanters, it also locked so the decanters and their stoppers could not be removed without the key!

Did you know that until the licensing act of 1860, spirits and wines were not sold in their own bottle? No, they were sold straight from the barrel, which meant if you wanted to buy alcohol, you also needed to take along a container to be filled. Until the first decanter was produced in the 1690s, a claret jug was typically used.

The first patented tantalus was in 1881 by George Betjemann, a cabinet maker from the Netherlands. However, the first tantalus prototype was introduced in Stourbridge in 1860 and was made of wood. There are differences of opinion as to why the tantalus was ever made, but the fun version is they were designed to protect the bottled goodness from the servants sneaking a few sips! As a result you will also hear a tantalus referred to as ‘The Butler’s Enemy’!

The tantalus solved two problems. With an increasing consumption of spirits in the home, it was one way to keep the alcohol from being pilfered, and at the same time allowed the showy decanters to remain on display, an important consideration for the Joneses of the day!

You will find a range of tantalus options and designs for holding 2 decanters, 3 decanters and sometimes even 4.

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You will also discover the tantalus design was adapted to accommodate other things: cigar boxes, fountain pens, perfume bottles and even tea in tins!

Let’s take a peek at a few options you might have seen at Audrey Would!

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Both are from the 1950s and are complete with lock and key. Our 2-decanter tantalus is quite unique with a wind up musical feature that plays, ‘How Dry Am I’ when one or both bottles are removed! How much fun is that?

If you are looking for a unique gift for Dad with historical roots, we think a tantalus is a great way to go!

If you want to learn more about the history of the tantalus… and there is a lot more to learn about in just the name itself… we recommend these two articles:

Once you read them, you decide. Was the tantalus designed to keep the servants from pilfering, or was it simply a novelty item meant to be enjoyed by the rising affluent middle class of the time?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller for Audrey Would! Please link and credit if you choose to use.

Vintage Barware Gifts for Dad

Father’s Day is coming, and that means it’s gift time for Dad! At Audrey Would! we’ve got you covered.

If you’re looking for unique Mid-Century barware options, we have them.

Fathers Day Gifts, Vintage Barware, Mid Century Modern Cocktail Gifts

If you want classic cocktail style, we have that. If you need something a little more rustic we carry rustic options with a sleek edge. And if Dad is more the Gatsby type, you will find crystal decanters and coupes with a flair!

If the barbeque is Dad’s thing, well we have an assortment of serving trays, carving sets and Glo-Hill steak knives to accompany Dad’s culinary confections hot off the smokin’ grill!

Glo-Hill Steak Knives, Vintage Cutlery, Mid-Century Modern Flatware


At Audrey Would! we have beer glassessports options, nautical pieces, whiskey sets and more. You still have time to gift for Dad. Why not pop by for a quick look? If you don’t see what you have in mind, please contact us. We work hard to accommodate!

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photo collages by Sheila Zeller for Audrey Would! Please link and credit if you choose to use.

Vintage Lenox Coupes… So Pretty!

My friend has a very keen eye and when she saw these gorgeous vintage Lenox cocktail coupes, well, she thought of AudreyWould! Can you see why?

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Lenox is an American company and among the best of the best. It is one of the world’s oldest and most respected names in fine china tableware, crystal and gifts. You will find Lenox pieces displayed in museums with many awards attached to its name, and a preferred choice by presidents over the years. Lenox is the couture of table dressing in homes across America and throughout the world!

This particular coupe features a beautifully shaped bowl with a delicate flare to its gold rim. If you flip the coupe over you will find it signed, ‘Lenox USA’ with their logo acid etched into the base.

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The detailed stem is octagon cut with sharp, vertical flutes stretching full length.

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Notice the stem detail at the top where it meets the coupe bowl, and how it is rounded where it meets the base.

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The stem is crafted like a very simplified Ionic column, with only partial scrolls atop the 8 flutes.

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Did you know there are three column styles, the Doric, Ionic and Corinthian? Once you are familiar with them, you will begin to see similarities in the endless variations of stemware stems. It’s actually kind of fun!

If you look closely at the reflection of the coupe bowl you can see how pretty the top of the stem-work is. *If you’re reading this on your phone, seriously, you need to enlarge your pic in order to appreciate!*

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This upside-down perspective really showcases the fine attention to detail in the quality craftsmanship of the stem’s finish.

These coupe bowls are also larger in size. Here you see the Corpse Reviver #2 cocktail in a single cocktail pour.

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This classic cocktail fills just half the coupe, and that’s before there’s even been one sip!

We are a fan of the larger bowl, because it makes these coupes very adaptable. Picture them standing in for a decadent dessert dish!

Lenox Crystal Cocktail Coupes, Gold Rims, Set of 6 - Audrey Would Vintage Home

With special thanks to my keen-eyed friend we are pleased that Audrey Would! now happens to have these Lenox coupes in a set of 6! If you are interested, please contact me for more details. :-)

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller for Audrey Would! Please link and credit if you choose to use.

Party Punch. What’s So Special About That?

As the weather warms and the heart of wedding season looms there’s one constant connector between the two. And that’s the appearance of punch at the party! Now we all know there’s a range in punch from the non-alcohol to the spiked imbibing with a kick!

We think this Art Deco punch bowl and these vintage coupes from Audrey Would! are the perfect party punch mix!

A 1940s vintage punch bowl in pretty purple. Made of blown glass and perfect for a special gathering of friends!

But did you know…

Punch pre-dates the cocktail? Why yes, it’s true! And in fact it’s so true that it goes back three centuries prior to the cocktail debut! Punch was first created in the 16th Century by British Soldiers stationed in India, while the first evidence of a cocktail albeit sans alcohol made its entrance in the early 19th Century. Who knew?

What’s so special about punch? I mean, we all grew up with it and have seen it at different occasions and gatherings, and with almost any combination of ingredients you can imagine.

This vintage Indiana Glass punch set from Audrey Would! has lived through one or two!

A vintage punch set with modern lines, perfect for today's lifestyle!

Well… here’s what’s really going on in that bowl.

Punch (and I am now referring to spiked punch) is all about communal drinking and fun! It’s about sharing the same drink with your friends, and if you’re the host it’s like a one-stop-shop. You basically mix one drink large enough to hydrate more than just a few, and then you get to join the party too!

This special edition punch set from Audrey Would! has got that all squared away. It comes with 16 cups!

A special edition Mid Century punch set , 'Golden Anniversary' by Champion.

So what’s really going on in that bowl?

Punch is more than just pouring a bunch of ingredients into a bowl and giving it a stir. In fact, that’s exactly what not to do! Here are the classic punch take-aways for the ‘right’ things to do.

  • Classic punch always contains 5 elements: spirits, sugar, citrus, water and spice. Did you know tea can be considered a spice? See how it’s used in the recipe at the end!
  • Punch is always stirred, but not the way you think. There are two ways to stir punch,
    • Over ice in a pitcher, but never in the punch bowl
    • Poured back and forth between two pitchers with ice (this is called rolling)
    • And then… you strain the punch into the bowl leaving the ice behind

Whaat? No ice??

  • Punch is served over a large block of ice rather than immersed with cubes.
    • This keeps the punch cold, but slows down dilution
    • And this is where the ice ring can substitute for the block of ice
  • Club Soda or sparkling wine are used for effervescence in punch.
    • That’s just what you do!
  • Definitely do add edible garnishes in the punch bowl.
    • They are the floating touch to your punchy presentation
    • And, guests can add to their drinks as they choose

But most importantly…

  • Pay tribute to the punch!
    • That’s right, serve your punch in a vintage bowl. That’s called serving it right, and at Audrey Would! we just happen to have a few. ;-)

To wrap all this up, we recommend you try Death & Co’s recipe for classic Mother’s Ruin Punch. The name says it all, doesn’t it?

Cheers to fun with friends! Do you have any punch tips, vintage bowls or recipes to share?

Thanks for stopping by!

Audrey Would Vintage Home

Photographs by Sheila Zeller for Audrey Would. Please link and credit if you choose to use!

Steamed Veggies, Vintage Serving Dish!

Mother’s Day is coming, and if you are making dinner you might want to try this quick and easy recipe for steamed veggies straight up. The flavours you get are simply the blend of the vegetables enhanced with a little dash of ground pepper and a sprinkle of course salt if you choose!

Stemaed Veggies 2415 (650)

Quick & Easy Steamed Vegetables

¾ cup white onion, chopped

¾ cup celery, chopped

¾ cup partially cooked carrots, chopped (save ¾ c cooking water)

½ red pepper, sliced

½ head orange cauliflower, broken into florets

Small handful snow peas, ends removed

Small handful green beans, ends removed

Small zucchini, chopped into chunky 1” pieces

Tbsp Butter

Salt & Pepper, to taste

  • Sautee chopped onions & celery in butter until lightly caramelized
  • Add carrots and cooking water
  • Add remaining vegetables
  • Season with salt and pepper
  • Cook uncovered until liquid is gone stirring periodically

Steamed Vegetables

Steamed Vegetables

Prep time 30 minutes / Makes enough for 4.

Serve in a vintage vegetable bowl from Audrey Would!

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Find this pretty pressed glass serving bowl here!

To mix things up we sometimes add a splash of lemon juice or white wine, maybe par-cook the carrots in chicken stock – it just depends. If you have the basics to work with, the possibilities are endless. If you have great serving pieces, the presentation is flawless!

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller for Audrey Would! Please link and credit if you choose to use.


Indiana Glass Cooler Tumbler. A Mixed Up History, But What A Great Vase!

Sometimes I see a vintage piece and just know it can’t be left behind! That’s how I felt when I saw this Indiana Glass vessel. Amber glass is back and hot on the scene. Whether you are planning a vintage themed wedding or just want a splash of colour in your home, an amber piece like this will work overtime for you!


Indiana Glass Amber Tumbler

Casual warmth with mega style, and stunning as it catches the light!

Here’s a little background on this pattern.

As with so much collectible glassware, this piece comes with a mixed up history. You will see its pattern referred to as both Whitehall and American Whitehall, with the technical name for the piece itself being a ‘Cooler’. A cooler is another name for a larger sized tumbler. As mentioned, there are in fact two variations of this design. Whitehall was produced by Indiana Glass in the early 1960s – 1980s, while the other, American Whitehall, was reproduced by Lancaster Colony – formerly Fostoria, in the early 1980s onward. To add to the mish-mash of details, in 1957 Indiana Glass was purchased by Lancaster Colony but continued production under Indiana Glass. In 1963 the glassware packaging was changed to: Indiana Glass, a subsidiary of the Lancaster Colony Corporation.

It’s no wonder there is so much confusion with collectible glassware! So, how can you tell an original Indiana Glass Whitehall from a Lancaster Colony reproduction? Well, it’s in the design details. Indiana Glass’ Whitehall has a wider band at its rim that is slightly flared.

Indiana Glass 'Whitehall' Cooler

Lancaster’s American Whitehall has a narrower band and no flare, or in the case of the matching pitcher, no band at all with a jagged rim that follows the lines of each cube edge. Pretty and collectible, but not produced using the original Indiana Glass molds. Instead Lancaster’s design was produced from the Fostoria molds inherited with the purhcase of Fostoria! Are you still with me?

These pieces were created using the pressed glass method. With pressed glass, also known as mold-pressed, the design is patterned only on the exterior surface while the inside is smooth, and that’s because the interior form is separate from the exterior and then fused. Mold-pressed glass is different than mold-blown glass in that the interior of mold-blown glass matches its outer form as there is no fusing between the two. And then there’s cut glass, but I think all I’ll say about this is molded glass has a softer surface shape than cut glass. It’s easy to see the difference because cut glass has sharp angles that sparkle and prism in the light, whereas molded glass has a more rounded surface with sparkle that is not quite as brilliant. And, if you look closely you can see hairline seams where the molded sections have been joined. You can just barely see the seams on the base of this piece.

Indiana Glass Amber Tumbler

One last tidbit about this particular piece. Indiana Glass’ Whitehall is most commonly found in amber, olive green and clear – known as crystal. It was also produced in two hues of blue – light blue and teal, as well as crystal with a ruby stain, but these options are less common. Lancaster Colony produced their pieces in amber, crystal, blue and peach.

Who knew there was so much to collectible glassware, especially this cube-pressed design? Do you have vintage glassware in your collection? Any that match this piece? I’d love to hear how you incorporate and enjoy your collectibles in today’s modern lifestyle. Is mix and match your thing, or do you prefer matching all-in?

If you love this large amber tumbler, you can purchase it here from Audrey Would! Doesn’t it make a great vase?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller for Audrey Would! Please link and credit if you choose to use.

A Gun Slinging Cocktail Paired With Collectible Pistol Roly Poly Glasses

On Saturdays we mix up a classic cocktail and pair it with vintage glassware from Audrey Would! It’s a lot of fun, and that’s before the cocktail has even been poured!

The cocktail we chose this time has been around for over 100 years so we decided to go with an established vintage bar glass classic, the Roly Poly. Roly Polies are great because they are made of blown glass and are rounded in shape. The base is perfectly weighted so the glass won’t tip over, and instead always lands on its feet… er, rolls onto its base!

Clear Roly Poly Bar Glass, Audrey Would!

Roly Polies come in at least three sizes, and for this cocktail we’re using the largest of the three, 3″W x 3-1/4″H. We didn’t go with the classic clear roly shown above, but instead opted for two collectible rolies featuring antique pistols. Gasp!

The first features a Pepperbox pistol from 1830.

Pepperbox Handgun Roly Poly Bar Glass,  Audrey Would!

The second, a Percussion duelling pistol from 1857.

Percussion Handgun Roly Poly Bar Glass, Audrey Would!

Note, these glasses are not faux frosted, they are actually chilled! Yes, pre-chilling your glassware is key when it comes to cocktails.

We chose these rolies for two reasons. One, we needed room for the cocktail with an oversized hand-carved cube of ice

Vintage Collectible Pistol Roly Poly Bar Glasses, Audrey Would!

And two, we wanted to feature these collectible glasses since the cocktail we chose is none other than the Whiskey Sour!

Whiskey Sour, Collectible Roly Poly Pistol Glasses, Audrey Would!

We thought this gun slinging cocktail was worthy of these very hard-to-find vintage roly poly pistol glasses. You see, the Whiskey Sour has been on the menu as far back as 1870, so even though both pistols pre-date the cocktail, we would venture a guess there has been a saloon or two where pistol wielding duals were fought!

Percussion Pistol Roly Poly Glass, Audrey Would!

If you look closely you can see where maybe, just maybe, a pistol was shot! ;-)

To learn more about the history of this thirst quenching delight… click here! Find our recipe, Cocktails by Clemens, here.

If you love these roly polies, the pair of pistol glasses is being sold with 6 clear rolies for a set of 8! Purchase here!

Vintage Roly Poly Collection, Audrey Would!

Are you a Whiskey Sour fan? Do you make yours with or without egg white?

Thanks for stopping by! Cheers :-)

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller for Audrey Would! Please link and credit if you choose to use.


Vintage Shot Glasses – Optical Illusion: Dominos or Dice?

Awhile ago I listed this set of shot glasses and referenced the design overlay as dice.

BAR-4108-SZ Dominos Shot Glasses, Black, Gold, Anchor Hocking (x4) (2)


I even featured these glasses in this Polyvore set thinking of them as dice…

Show Me the Money


I never thought much more about it until I received this email:


While I was browsing your site, I noticed that the “Shot Glasses, Black & Gold Dice, Anchor Hocking” should actually be labelled “Vintage Shot Glasses, Black & Gold Dominos, Anchor Hocking”.

I love your website – it was a real stroll down memory lane.  I grew up in the fifties-seventies and saw many of the barware pieces either in my parents’ home, friends’ homes, or I had considered purchasing them as wedding gifts!

I actually have my own set of Baribocraft teak salad bowls that I received as a wedding gift in 1980 and it is used regularly.

Thank you,



When I went back and took another look, sure enough, the ‘dice’ were clearly domino tiles!

BAR-4108-SZ Dice Shot Glasses, Black, Gold, Anchor Hocking (x4) (1)

And now that I see the dominos I can’t believe I didn’t see them before. I think this was a case of optical illusion, one of those brain teasers where you either see the young woman or the old woman, two profiles or a goblet. You know the ones.

Isn’t it funny how this works?

I think this illustrates another important aspect to keep in mind. What one sees is not necessarily what another sees, so always be true to yourself and enjoy the things you like!

If you are looking for unique vintage barware, perhaps some Canadian vintage Baribocraft, maybe a retro wedding gift option – why not pop over to Audrey Would! and enjoy a browse through our vintage collections? We carry pieces ranging from the 1920s to 1970s with a large focus on Mid-Century Modern classics!

If you don’t see what you are looking for please contact us! We might have just the thing, but haven’t got it listed yet… and we are always happy to treasure hunt for you!

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use!


Easter Table Decor: Keep it Simple Tips from Audrey Would!

It’s no secret, Easter is just around the corner, and the long weekend awaits. I don’t know how your March went, but mine went fast! That’s code for needing to keep things simple and enjoy the moments that matter.

Our tip for keeping this Easter simple?

Cocktail Shaker Easter Centrepiece, Audrey Would!

Mix it up with pieces that work double time.

Here’s how:

  1. Multipurpose what you have
  2. Use a splash of colour to set the tone
    • Purple tulips for a hit of Easter colour
  3. Add a little sparkle to keep it festive
  4. Keep it functional with creative charm

Do you have a tip to add to Audrey Would!‘s list? How do you keep things simple to fully celebrate Easter and this time for renewal?

Wishing you a very Happy Easter! Thanks for stopping by!!

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