Culver & Acadian Distillers: A Mystery in Canadian History

At Audrey Would we are always on the lookout for unique vintage pieces, and when we find pieces that are Canadian vintage we are eager to learn more.

When these limited edition Acadian Distillers whiskey glasses were sourced I was advised they were Culver glasses.

Acadian Distillers Whiskey Glasses (x6) (1)

Culver Glassware, founded in Brooklyn, NY in the late 1930s, produced more traditional patterns earlier on until the late 1950s when they collaborated with Georges Briard to produce his gold screened patterns. These Acadian whiskey glasses certainly fit a more traditional profile for what we now commonly connect to Culver style.

When Culver moved on from their work with Briard they began to produce more contemporary designs under the Culver label, and become known for their top secret process of heat firing highly decorative, thick, textured and opulent 22k gold patterns. Culver’s designs gave ‘dripping with gold’ a whole new context in the world of glassware!

Here you see an example of a signed Culver piece in their very popular 1960s Valencia pattern.

Culver 'Valencia' Rocks Glass

So how does Culver’s history and Acadian Distillers mesh? Well we know Culver’s earlier pieces are hard to identify as they were left unsigned, and we know Culver started producing gold embellished glassware in the late 1950’s. Acadian Distillers was founded in 1957, so it is quite possible that Culver created these limited edition glasses for the Distillery.

Acadian Distillers Whiskey Glasses (x6) (4)The decorative style to these glasses, especially in the raised 22k gold design feel very Culver. And… in the late 1960s Culver became ‘the’ designer of choice for the up-and-coming as a result of their Valencia pattern’s popularity.

For Acadian Distillers, up-and-coming was a perfect fit! Founded in Bridgetown, Nova Scotia during the heart of its boom time, they were one of the largest employers in the community, producing Acadian Signature and Old Canada 8 YO Blended whisky. To quote the Chronicle Herald,

Bridgetown, a town that once hummed like a well-oiled, money-making machine of factories, shipbuilders and merchants… 

I think this quote captures the vibrant prestige of not only Acadian Distillery at the time, but why Culver would be ‘the’ choice to produce custom designed glassware for Acadian.

However, I was unable to find any information to verify these glasses as Culver specifically… even in spite of the good fit!

Do you know anything about Acadian Distillers? How about this collectible set? Find more information to purchase them here!

Thanks for stopping by!

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All photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use!

Shat-R-Pruf Spaghetti String Cocktail Glasses

Did you know the once popular psychedelic spaghetti lamps of the retro 1960s-70s strung their style into cocktail glasses, too?

That’s right. Coined ‘spaghetti string’ glasses, these vintage roly poly glasses are from the Shat-R-Pruf line made by Colour Craft Corporation out of Indianapolis.

Spaghetti String Roly Poly Caddy Set (x8) Colour Craft (3)

Shat-R-Pruf pieces were made of glass and coated with plastisol, a liquid form of vinyl cured by heat to set the shape. If you look closely at the rim of these rolies you can see the glass is clear. The actual colour is in the Tu-tone Plastisol, the first layer being the solid coating and colour, the second layer being the spaghetti string design.

Spaghetti String Roly Poly Caddy Set (x8) Colour Craft (2)

Plastisol feels rubbery to the touch and makes the glasses easier to hold. The vinyl coating also makes the glasses shatter proof and acts as an insulator. This means drinks stay colder for longer, but with less slippery condensation on the glass! I would say these are quality features in a cocktail glass, but others might deem them ‘safety’ features, too! 😉

BAR-4098-SZ Spaghetti Roly Poly Caddy Set (x8) Colour Craft (1)

And… apparently these glasses will not stain or fade, and are dishwasher safe. I won’t argue with the manufacturer, but I have my own reservations about vintage treasures and dishwashers playing in the same game. I’ll leave that decision up to you! Whatever you decide, definitely do not prolong soaking – this will encourage the plastisol coating to peel… I’ve done this!

If you want to go retro but aren’t too hip on psychedelic swag, why not add this Shat-R-Pruf caddy set to your own barware collection? Interested… Purchase here.

At Audrey Would! we think they are a fun-tastic find!

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use!

 

Vintage Tumbler Caddy Set: All Crinkled Up!

Summer is definitely here – is anyone else melting?

This latest treasure find was just listed in Audrey Would! I am featuring it because it’s the perfect accessory for these crazy, hot days, and also because there is a little history behind the pattern name of the glasses.

GlassTumbler & Caddy Set, Anchor Hocking (2) 600

 

These glasses were made by Anchor Hocking in the mid-1960s. The pattern of this set is called Lido Glass, but the original pattern was introduced in 1959 as Milano Glass. Production of the Milano pattern spanned 1959 to 1963, and was only produced in Avocado Green and Crystal (clear).

Zanesville Mould Company, a new subsidiary of Anchor Hocking at the time, was assigned to making new Milano moulds to replace the old ones. As it turns out, the new moulds were quite different from the originals,  which resulted in the pattern name being changed to Lido Glass.

The two patterns are very similar, however the Milano pattern is more textured and the crinkle more defined. One way to tell a Lido piece from a Milano is that the Lido pattern does not extend right to the rim. Look closely at the glass below, and you will see a plain band around the rim where the pattern has stopped.

Tumbler & Caddy Set, Anchor Hocking (3) 600

Lido Glass, like Milano, was produced in Avocado Green and Crystal, but it was also produced in Honey Gold, Spicy Brown, Aquamarine, and Laser Blue.

Crinkle glassware was popular at the time, and there were other companies producing their variation of this prevalent pattern trend as well. Morgantown Glass Company was one, but their Crinkle line has a distinctly different look. The tumblers are less uniform, and the crinkle is not as pronounced. In order to respect copyright, I could not share an image with you, but this link will take you to one. Seneca Glass Company with their Driftwood Casual line was another, see image here.

So you can see it’s not always easy to tell one crinkle glass from the next, but now you have a few more tips to at least tell Milano and Lido apart from one another!

You know what I love most about this Lido crinkle glass set? It’s easy… just grab your caddy and go!

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use!

 

Vintage Metal Milk Crates Go Curbside!

No, it’s not what you might think? Sadly, we aren’t getting our milk delivered to our doorstep in old glass milk bottles carted in vintage metal crates… but we can wish!

It all started with a quick little thrift, and somehow I ended up with these!

Milk Crates (2)

The shop keeper was so great – he told me he remembered these crates from when he was just a kid. His family owned a corner store, and the milk used be delivered in crates like these. The one in the foreground is apparently older, he thought from at least the early 1950s. If you notice, the top and bottom are different than the ones in the background.

Here’s another look.

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On the left are two crates, one stacked inside the other, and do you see the round ends at the top of each corner? Now check out the top of the lone 1950s crate. No round ends at its upper corners. According to the shop keeper, the stacked crates are from the mid1960s and were purposefully redesigned to better accommodate storage.

Here’s a bird’s-eye view of both vintage crate styles.

Milk Crates (1)

Can you see the bar sitting towards the inside  top of the left crate? The 1960s crates were designed with two bars opposite each other at the top. The purpose of the round ends I mentioned earlier was to enable the bars to slide, and this was so the crates could stack one inside of the other when empty.

If you look closely below, you’ll see a slight taper to the profile of the 1960s crates compared to the 1950s design. In this image you can also see how the bars slip in and out of place, and that when they narrow up they also dip lower. This creates a ridge for the top crate to sit down into.

Milk Crates (5)

Both styles of crates were designed to stack. The problem was transporting and storing them when they were empty. You see, the 1950s crates took up the same storage space whether empty or full, and were cumbersome to move.

With the improved 1960s design, not only did the crates stack better when full, but the sliding rods allowed them to stack inside of each other when empty making carting and storing a lot easier! The shop keeper told me storage was always a problem, especially with the 1950s style, and that any overflow of empty crates simply got left outside. Hmmm, can you tell?

Here’s how I’m using my vintage milk crates now…

Milk Crates Potted Up (1)

Milk Crates Potted Up

Milk Crates Potted Up (2)

Milk Crates Potted Up (4b)

The fun part of this story…

I fell in love with the 1950s crate on the spot, and really wanted a few more. But when I looked around all I could see were crates that had been painted black. Now I love my black, but in this case I love weathered and rusty more. It just so happens my friendly shop keeper had what I was looking for… he just had to fetch them from out behind his storage shed, grass, dirt and all! 😉 Love it!!

I do love rusty ‘old’ things, and if you missed it, I wrote about ‘that’ crush here!

How about you? For the love of vintage, do you prefer your pieces to be aged and old, or DIYed to look new?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please credit and link if you choose to use! 🙂