Votive Holder Becomes a Vase!

I’ve had this pretty cool set of  chunky glass votive holders for quite a few years now, but have stopped using them. In fact, I even set them aside to donate with my next thrifting purge.

Chunky Glass Votive Holder

I still actually quite like them, but you know how it is. Sometimes you just move on.

And I really had moved on… until I brought home a bunch of tulips the other day. I have vases, but I was feeling restless, and wanted a change.

For some reason these votive holders came to mind, and then it all fell into place.

Chunky Glass Votive Holder turned Vase

Sometimes it pays to think outside of the box!

Tulip Collage

An unexpected bonus – the inverted dip for the votive became a great stabilizer for holding the tulips upright and in place!

Tulips in Votive Holder

I have decided to keep them after all. Whether or not they’ll see candles again is hard to say, but I know they’ll see tulips again soon… I have three of these chunky vessels and I think a trio for Easter might be kind of nice!

How about you? Have you given something a new purpose lately? If so, what did you do?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller; Please link and credit if you choose to use! :-)

Multi-purposing Ombre Barware: Transitioning Flowers from Morning to Night!

Vintage barware can be so much more than meets the eye – you just have to see it with a different eye! Here I take an everyday floral bouquet, and present it in a bouquet of vintage ombre vessels showing you how to multi-purpose the barware, and transition flowers from morning to night!

These are the ombre vessels I started with…

Vintage Silver Ombre Carafes & PitchersFrom L-R, a 1950-60s Vitreon Queens Lustreware carafe, Libbey carafe and Vitreon Queens cocktail pitcher.

I also selected an embossed ombre roly poly (below). This roly has a lot of its ombre worn off around the embossed pattern, so it’s become a spare in the Audrey collection – not for sale, but too pretty to ignore. The everyday bouquet you see is a simple mix of flowers in deep reds and white. To honour this coming Saint Patrick’s Day I picked up a pot of Irish Moss and some extra filler in bright pops of green!

Embossed Ombre Roly Poly

I’ve put my own spin on a current and popular  trend to group different but similar vases together with the same type of flower. See more of the latest trends over at ProFlowers blog here! Instead of staying with the same flower, it’s the mercury fade (ombre) that I’m highlighting as the common theme. My twist is taking the every day bouquet from a daytime setting to an evening presentation!

Ombre Barware as Vases

These mini brandy snifters are more seconds in Audrey’s mix, but I refuse to say, all is lost. I opted to incorporate candles into this theme and decided to use them for tealight holders instead! Pairing candlelight with the ombre’s reflective surface was simply a natural fit.

By planting the Irish Moss in the roly poly, I was able to camouflage the worn ombre, and give this vintage glass new life.

Embossed Ombre Roly Poly as a Planter

The flicker of candlelight made the embossed pattern come alive.

Embossed Ombre Roly Poly in Candlelight

To reinforce the silver reflective theme, I’ve set the roly on a 1960s Park Sherman crystal coaster with a silver plated rim, and the tealights on Kimiko mercury glass coasters.

And to pull everything together the arrangement of flowers, candles and coasters have been set out on a vintage Canadian ‘Silhouette Quality’ tin tray with a leaf pattern that reinforces the cut stems and greenery.

Ombre Vessels in Flower Arrangements

I’ve set the tray on layered linen tea towels to warm and soften the feel of the cool, reflective surfaces, to define the overall presentation, and to pull together the colour scheme. The tea towels are what make this presentation work by day, giving it a cheery, relaxed feel.

I’ve kept the floral presentation more casual by adding Bear Grass, allowing it to whisp freely and umbrella the tray.

Vintage Canadian 'Silhouette Quality' Tin Tray

It’s the deep coloured flowers, the candles and reflective surfaces of the sleek, elegant ombre that make this presentation work by night!

Silver Ombre Vessels as Vases

Do you notice how the linen tea towels blend and almost fade away? If you really want to change the feel for the evening, just lift the tray and remove the tea towels – it’s that simple!

A recap of tips:

  • utilize vessels beyond their intended purpose – here it was vintage barware
  • pick your common theme and run with it – in this case, vintage pieces with reflective surfaces, candlelight, and deep red flowers
  • draw the eye into the whole scene – I did this by using similar but not identical pieces positioned at varying heights
  • integrate layering and texture – I layered the main vessels onto the tray and coasters, and brought the whole presentation together by placing it on the layered tea towels
  • group and run the odds – the larger vessels are grouped together, the candles and coasters placed out front, and I’ve used odd numbers of like things
  • think subtle reinforcements – here, the connection of colour in the flowers to the tea towels, reflective surfaces of the pieces to the flickering of candlelight, leaf pattern on the tray to cut stems and greenery – all work together to reinforce the overall presentation.

Vintage Silver Ombre Barware as Vases

At this time of year you can lighten things up with pretty pinks and yellows, purples and whites, but I like the drama of deep red against the silver tones in these vintage barware pieces… even though I know Audrey Would ‘think pink’!

What floral presentations are you noticing and loving these days? What items have you seen multi-purposed to stand in for vases instead?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please credit and link if you choose to use! :-)

 

 

Mixing DIY and Vintage Glam for a Modern Vintage Look

The much anticipated VintAGEous Fair in Victoria has come and gone. It was a lot of fun and a successful day with a huge thank you to Sarah Rempel for her stellar organizing of the event, and to all the customers who stopped by!

In prepping for an event like this there is a lot of work that goes on behind the scenes, and for me one of the things I focus on is presentation. How am I going to maximize my space, feature a variety of pieces AND keep them safely on display? This time around I decided to have some fun juxtaposing a rustic vintage look with the vintage glam of Audrey Would! Do you remember these pallets I posted on Facebook and Instagram?

Pallets

A super big thank you goes out to Leigh Davies for parting with them! Leigh had a plan for the pallets, but passed them on to me instead putting her own project on hold! I’m guessing the pallets had something to do with Mid-Island Ink Depot,  ‘the’ place to buy toner cartridges in the Cowichan Valley! Leigh is ‘Mrs. Ink’ in the mix of Chris and Leigh, Chris of course being Mr. Ink!

So the pallets…

I asked my Dad to turn them into rustic crates. My idea was to pack them with inventory selected for the fair, and then use them to display the pieces. When you’re in a limited footprint it’s important to utilize your vertical space, and in this case my footprint was a 6′ table, so I had to create my own verticle!

These are the first four crates. My Dad’s neighbour, Bryan came up with a few more pallets and that was enough for me to end up with seven crates!

DIY Crates from Pallets

I wanted reasonable gaps between each slat to allow a little light in. With presentation in mind I also toyed with giving each crate a sanding and watered down staining for a more weathered look, but decided to leave that for another time!

When I’m pulling inventory for a fair I always do a test-run set-up. I find this really helps me narrow down the pieces and once there, makes set-up go quickly and smoothly. In this case, because the crates are made with pallets, I had to figure out which ones ‘fit’ best together. They’re all ‘roughly’ the same, but some slats are a bit warped, others not perfectly square.

Here’s a little look at my ‘Operation Basement’ test-run! This is an 8′ table, so I’ve taped it off at 6′. The pieces off to the side are back-up pieces I selected to replace items as they sold.

Test-run Table Set-Up - VintAGEous Fair

Like any behind-the-scenes, you can see there’s a lot less glamour than meets the public eye! I think that’s part of the challenge – to envision each display regardless of its surroundings. At the fairs you have no control over the backdrop, so all you can do is focus on your own display.

Another thing I try to do is put out a good selection while still keeping it presented. Less is more as a general rule of thumb, but for fairs I pack more into the space than I normally would. I try to layer the pieces down and bring them out while staying focused on theme, visual interest and overall flow. I place sparkly pieces where they will catch and bounce the light, and with this display my hope was the pieces out front would draw the eye to what was displayed in the crates.

Display Collage

Remember I said you have no control over the backdrop of your space?

Display Set-Up - VintAGEous Fair

In this case my table was set up in the daycare area of the Fernwood Community Centre!

Another part of my presentation is to draw the eye up, and with this display I featured larger pieces with chrome, and stood a crystal tray behind the glasses for sparkle en mass! This is where having a sign also really helps!

Display Set-Up - VintAGEous Fair

Behind the sloped trim is actually an access ramp to the area, which worked well for where my table was placed. Everyone coming down the ramp was able to see my table, and I hope the shiny sign and sparkle of the pieces helped catch their eye!

Since the Oscars were hot on the heels of the fair, and by now you all know the inspiration behind ‘Audrey’, this was my center display.

Disply - Center Section - VintAGEous Fair

Audrey Hepburn with her Oscar for the leading role in Roman Holiday, her first Hollywood movie and first leading role! I featured the tall clear decanter with this display, because it reminded me of the Oscar Audrey is holding! Here Audrey is attending the 54th Oscars.

In keeping with the theme, this year we watched the 86th Oscars at home in vintage Audrey Would! style…

Audrey Would! - Vintage Pieces - 86th Oscars

  • Northern Divine caviar served in a classic bamboo stemmed coupe;
  • Prosecco in sleek vintage Czechoslovakian crystal coupes; and
  • Ceasar salad in the vintage Baribocraft bowls I featured here and here.

Simple and elegant at-home-chic. So much fun! There is something to be said for classic vintage, don’t you think?

If you weren’t able to attend the VintAGEous Fair, you will find many of the pieces I had there over at Audrey Would! I am working on listing more pieces for you to see, so  don’t hesitate to contact me if you are looking for something special, or saw a treasure you wished you’d picked up. I am always happy to help!

Thanks for stopping by!

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AudreyWould Web - Business Card - Smoke - Side 2-sz

Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please credit and link if you choose to use!

Modern Audrey: Today’s Use for the Vintage Murano Glass Ashtray!

Murano glass is incredibly beautiful, and in its vintage day was often made into ashtrays. But with the glamour days of Lucky Strike long gone, the ashtray has been removed from pride of place in the home, and more often than not, stashed in a cupboard or thoughtlessly tossed away. I say, what a shame! What a shame to lose sight of the beauty within the object.

Murano glass is thick and masterfully crafted, the layers of colour so pretty…

Green Swirl Murano Glass Ashtray 1

I love the way light dances, bounces and sparkles as it brings exquisite pieces to life.

Green Swirl Murano Glass Ashtray 2

A flower bowl is just one way to transition vintage Murano art glass ashtrays into modern times. Other uses – a dip bowl, candy or nut dish, paperclip dish, kitchen scrubbie container, and if you’re gentle, it’s even great for a set of keys. They say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks, but Audrey Would! says you can! Find more details on this vintage beauty here.

How would you use this piece?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use! :-)

 

The Cycle of A Thrift!

How was your weekend? All-in-all ours was pretty darned good since we were able to capitalize on the bright spots in our mixed bag of weather!

Saturday we wandered through the Duncan Farmer’s Market, stopping in for a chat at some of our favorite stands. When we popped by Makaria Farm’s stand, little did I know a very cool story was about to emerge.

This is my friend Heather, and you might remember her from my earlier posts, here and here.

Heather - Makaria Farm

Heather McLeod, Makaria Farm

You see that little chalk board? We were together when Heather thrifted it back a few months ago. The perfect little stand. Small, fold-able  portable, well-made as in dove tail corners, solid wood well-made, and above all, farm stand functional. All that packed into one thrifted little find!

Where the cycle of a thrift comes in? One of Makaria Farm’s long-time customers and acquaintances happened to ask about the new addition, specifically, where Heather had gotten it. And when Heather said she thrifted it, the woman was able to pinpoint from where! What are the chances?

As it turns out, this little chalkboard had once belonged to her! And… she had originally acquired it on her own thrifting adventures many years ago!

Now, how coincidental is that?

I love this story. You just never know where a good thrift has been, or when you might see it again. And you can be sure, there’s a story behind every one! ;-)

Do you have any thrifting coincidences like this to share? What have you got planned for the week ahead? Any treasure seeking adventures calling your name?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photograph by Sheila Zeller

 

Guest Post by Meghan Plowman from The Orchard: Tips for Decorating with Vintage Finds

Good morning and welcome to a special guest post feature!

Today I am really excited to introduce Meghan Plowman, lifestyle photographer and author of The Orchard blog! Meghan and I became virtually acquainted in a really neat kind of way… Believe it or not, I know Meghan’s aunt, Barb Nugent. Now having an acquaintance in common may not seem so unusual, except that Meghan lives in Perth, Australia… and as you know, I live on the west coast of Canada! Who knew our worlds would touch in this way? And for those of you living in the Cowichan Valley, you might know Barb, too. She’s a volunteer and fundraising organizer extraordinaire for our local Hospice Society – did you attend the recent fashion show fundraiser Barb organized?

From one thrifting vintage lover to another, thank you so much Meghan for being my guest today, and thank you Barb for the introduction!

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Hello readers! I am thrilled to be contributing to sZinteriors blog today. I’d like to share with you some images of my own styling work and some tips about decorating with vintage finds, and what to keep in mind when looking for items to decorate with.

I am a lifestyle photographer and stylist living and working in Perth, Western Australia. You can see more of the work I get up to over at The Orchard blog as well as my Facebook page.

I particularly love bringing a mix of items into my styling work and tend to lean upon my ever-growing props cupboard for inspiration and interesting additions to imagery. Quite often you’ll find me either in a vintage market or peeling through layers of verge side household piles!

This first example shows an image I was asked to put together that had a real Autumn story.

Autumn, Meghan Plowman Photograph

For the sake of putting together this vignette I brainstormed all of the things I love about Autumn including:

  • Cooking
  • Fallen leaves and spending time camping in nature
  • Hot drinks
  • Rustic, earthy colour and texture
  • Reading indoors

It’s my belief that you can find the perfect touches for little or next to no cost, sitting just outside your door or at your nearest thrift store. For example, I found the pine cone and leaves from my garden, used a bottle I found at a garage sale and a camping cup I managed to find on the side of the road.

Next, this Easter table setting was created to inspire readers to dress their table for the holiday.

Easter table, Meghan Plowman Photograph

My table was inspired by the florals, fruits and textures of the cooler months of Autumn (it’s Autumn here in the land of down under when we celebrate Easter!)

Some inexpensive and thrifty ideas for dressing a table for your next soiree:

  • Use butchers paper or left over fabric roll as a table runner
  •  Place brightly coloured fruits and vegetables as a centre piece or scattered along the centre of a table
  • Try a collection of glass jars in different heights and finishes for e.g. amber, frosted, textured, jars with labels or logos, grouped together with loose florals cut from the garden to create interest and an eclectic decoration.
  • Branches and twigs are an easy way to create height to a centre piece and act as a ‘tree’ for hanging decorations, name tags and sweets.
  • Add some quirkiness to your setting by adding a figurine or interesting knick knack. It will create a talking point for guests and makes things fun.

If you find yourself with a collection of seemingly unrelated finds that you are unsure what to do with, perhaps take a step back and look at what the items have in common visually, if anything.

  • Are they similar colours or textures?
  • Were they bought or found in the same location?
  • Do they tell a story, for e.g. are they items found at the beach or are they all travel mementos?
  • Can you create a visual story with the items?

The next two images show examples of how I grouped a mix of random, found objects together to create a story, one based on the idea of reading books in a cozy corner, the other a seaside tale. The reason these two work well is because I tied them together through their similar colour and textures.

Vintage Vignette, Meghan Plowman Photograph

Items I used for the first image:

  • A road side chair which we painted grey
  • A discarded old book with the pages carefully peeled away and taped to a wall to create a background texture
  • A stack of my favourite design books with the spines showing text
  • An ampersand gift tag to create drama and a focal point
  • A vintage camera –why not display your picture taking equipment?
  • A ball of garden twine, and
  • A favourite scarf

Vintage Vignette, Meghan Plowman Photograph

The second idea:

  • Thrift store found vases
  • Left over soft rope
  • Found twigs, feather and pine cones
  • Mixed teatowels and scraps of art canvas roll
  • Garlic peelings! – These create a lovely texture for still life
  • Scraps of fabric
  • Found bottles
  • Old book pages
  • Found sea urchin and shells

I hope I have given you a few ideas for decorating with old, found or simply scrap items you have lying around your home! I am a believer that beauty can be found in anything, it’s just keeping your eyes open to seeing it. I’d love to hear your ideas and feedback! I can be contacted through The Orchard blog.

Have Meghan’s tips enticed you to head out and see what treasures you can find? I bet you have a corner, a mantle, a wall, a porch, a __________ (you fill in the blank!) waiting to be freshly styled. I love the theme that it’s not necessarily what so much as how you choose to display your objects. Mixing up textures and telling a story is the key! If you get a chance, please pop over to The Orchard and introduce yourself! And if you check out Meghan’s Facebook page there’s a certain connection posted there to my post from yesterday! Do you think you can find it?  ;-)

Thank you once again Meghan, for sharing at sZinteriors today. :-)

Guest Post: Decorating With Bottles Of All Sorts

Today I’m excited to introduce my guest, Mari from Arcadian Home! If you haven’t shopped Arcadian Home, you really need to pop over. There is inspiration and eye candy galore. Trust me, you won’t be disappointed!

Thanks so much for joining sZinteriors today, Mari!

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Hello, everyone! It’s wonderful to be here with you at sZinteriors with a guest post from Arcadian Home blog. It’s an awesome place to find lots of interior design inspiration including beautiful home decor ideas from oval wall mirrors to lovely lighting for the foyer and much more.

Today, we’re going to take a look at decorating with bottles of sorts. From clear glass to brilliant cobalt blue, the vintage bottle is at once versatile and charming as a collection or a single perfect piece. Please enjoy!

Thanks to Sheila for letting me stop by for a visit.

~ Mari

Bottles in Decor

Two large green bottles can be seen in a living room bookcase filled with antique books, coral, seashells and interesting found objects. Shelves are also a great place to display collections of smaller bottles.

Bottles in Decor

A white vintage mantle looks so pretty with a collection of green, blue and clear glass bottles—made even more interesting by choosing each bottle in a different size. It’s such a fresh look for spring or summer.

Bottles in Decor

Vintage medicine bottles and other drugstore-related boxes and containers line the shelves in this white kitchen. What a clever idea to create a little theme by displaying the medicine bottles just below the pharmacy sign!

Bottles in Decor

A collection of mostly pale blue vintage glass bottles looks pretty on a thick glass floating bathroom shelf. How cool is the idea to hang a framed photograph of a contemporary meets rustic bathroom in a vintage bath.

Bottles in Decor

Colorful glass bottles march along a shelf above a built-in desk in the living room of this newly renovated 100-year-old home. Modern pendant lights are hung above the dining table and in the living room.

Bottles in Decor

A large fat glass bottle is a perfect decorative object for this coastal living room dressed up in a watery blue and soft tan color palette.

Bottles in Decor

Blue green antique spritzer bottles draw the eye to the top of a rustic white paned-glass cabinet. Blue canning jars hold white tulips on the table. It’s a lovely combination that ties the room together nicely.

Bottles in Decor

An interesting mix of vintage and contemporary bottles is just right for this eclectic outdoor dining room. I would love to see twin Mid-Century buffet lamps on either end of this washed wood sideboard. Images 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8

What do you think of these bottle decor inspirations? Leave us your comments below and visit our blog for more home decor and lighting inspirations!

Vintage Lowney’s Campfire Marshmallow Tin

Not too long ago on a thrifting round I spied a bright, cheerful tin hanging out with a bunch of old tools and things.

Vintage Lowney's Marshmallow Tin c1930-40s

Maybe it was the ‘Campfire’ label that suggested a fit, but to me it looked out of place among the rusty grit and grime of the others.

So I pulled it off the shelf to take a closer look.

Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval

Marshmallows. Who knew marshmallows once came in a tin? Along with a ‘Tested and Approved’ Good Housekeeping Institute seal of approval to boot! No wonder this tin didn’t belong in the grimy group!

A little digging confirmed the tin originated in Montreal, and was manufactured by Walter M. Lowney Co. Limited – as in Lowney’s the maker of all things candy, chocolates ‘n yummy, sweet treats! According to the Canadian Museum of Civilization this particular tin dates back to no earlier than 1930, and no later than 1940. I love it when dates are so precise!

Here’s another look at the sweet marshmallow tin.

Vintage Lowrey's Marshmallow Tin c.1930-40

I didn’t leave it behind, but I didn’t bring it home for me, either. My friend, Heather loves yellow, and was on the hunt for a cool, old tin so I decided to pass this one on to her. I figured orange was part of the happy yellow family, and the label more than made up for the rest!

Here’s how she utilized the tin.

Vintage Campfire Marshmallow Tin Sewing Box, c.1930-40

{Photo by Heather McLeod}

And this is the nice little note she sent with the photo above.

I LOVE my marshmallow tin. It fits all those awkward sewing supplies that don’t fit in my little tins (e.g. the one on the right), like fabric pens and tall stuff and scissors. I haven’t come close to filling it yet.

Thank you Sheila!!!

And this is what treasure seeking is all about. I love it when outings end like this!

Linking up here…

Junkin Joe

Between Naps on the Porch

Thanks for stopping by.

I hope you had a really great Easter weekend!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller unless otherwise stated.

It’s All About Personal Taste!

Not too long ago a mid-century style vase caught my eye, but I decided to walk away. Good, right? Well you’d think, except I couldn’t let it go. I kept thinking about it and knew I’d be back in the area in a week… but would the vase?

Enter my friends the following week, and I near dragged them to the back of the thrift store where the vase had been… and as luck would have it, still was!

MCM Gray Glazed, Brown Ribbed Vase

Um, they weren’t so smitten. So I sent this pic to my hubs to get his reaction. Only, his response didn’t reach me in time. I paced, and contemplated, waited until I had to make a decision. Was it walk away for a second time, or buy it without hub’s feedback?

I bought, I left, and in came his response… always the way, isn’t it? Nope, he wasn’t sold, either. Didn’t love it, didn’t hate it, just not all warm and fuzzy about it! Apparently I was in this one alone – my daughter flat out hated it, and another friend diplomatically withheld comment. ;-)

Well that was a month ago. Every day I look at this vase, and every day I still like it. Why? I don’t know, I just do. I’ve researched it, but can’t come up with much.

This vintage white glazed French jar and lid, c. 1940, was the closest I could find.

1st Dibs - White Glazed French Jar & Cover, c1940s

{1st Dibs}

1st Dibs - White Glazed French Jar & Cover, c.1940s

{1st Dibs}

Can you believe this piece is 4′-8″ tall x 34″ wide?

I’m certain my vase isn’t this vintage, but who knows, maybe this French jar was the inspiration piece!

Here’s the bottom of my vase.

MCM Gray Glazed, Brown Ribbed Vase Bottom

You’ll notice it doesn’t have any glaze on it, but do you see the etched mark? That’s likely the symbol of the artist. And the dark brownish marks indicate to me that this bottom was once covered in signature felt. You might remember my Royal Haeger vase with its signature felt bottom here. If I had to guess, I’d guess this vase is c.1970s, but if you know for sure, I’d love to hear from you!

To make a long story short, my vase is a great reminder of what’s important when you’re choosing pieces for your home. Never second guess what speaks to you. Surround yourself with things that draw you in, even if no-one else seems to see what you see. If you do this you’ll always feel at home in your home, and that’s what it’s all about!

Oh, and guess what was on the cover of my latest HGTV magazine?

HGTV Magazine Cover - April 2013

Do you see it? Not the same shape, not the same colour or finish… but don’t you think the ribbing suggests they could be relatives?

Maybe there’s someone out there who can see what I see in my beloved vase afterall!

Do you have anything in your collection that makes others roll their eyes? Well, that’s okay, just remember what happened to the Ugly Duckling!

Thanks for stopping by!

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BTW – this vase may or may not turn up in my bedroom makeover… but you’ll have to wait and see! :-)

I was featured over at Junkin Joes. Thanks Andrea!

Junkin Joe Linky Party - I Was Featured

Photographs by Sheila Zeller unless otherwise stated.

Thrifting: What Story Hangs Here?

Another treasure seeking adventure…

This time I came across a whole collection of vintage wooden hangers, some marked, and some designed without a name!

I thought it would be fun to peek inside a few historical closets, and get a glimpse of what these hangers might have seen.

LAURIENTE’S, Trail BC

My Dad was born in Trail, so let’s start here!

  Waymark

Lauriente’s general merchant store (building to the left) was built in 1904 by Camille Lauriente, an Italian immigrant who arrived in Trail at the turn of the century. Lauriente’s clothing store is said to be the first brick building built in the Trail area.

Waymark

These front steps were made of marble tile, and constructed as steadfast as the business itself, which was in operation for 70 years! No wonder a Lauriente hanger still remains! The Laurientes were a large family, and a colourful piece of Trail’s history. You will find the Lauriente name weaving through the Kootenay area still today.

HOTEL VANCOUVER, Vancouver BC

Did you know there were two Hotel Vancouver’s prior to the one that stands today?

Vancouver Skyscrapers

Yes, the predecessors were located a block away from where the Hotel Vancouver now sits. The building you see here was the second hotel, and was built in 1916 by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR). It became a troop barracks during World War II, but was demolished in 1949 under the ownership of the Canadian National Railway (CNR). Construction of the new hotel was halted for many years as a result of the Depression, but in 1937 was finally completed and opened its doors in 1939 becoming an icon in the city with its dramatic Chateau roof.

Vancouver Skyscrapers

Interesting facts:

  1. The CPR built Chateau style hotels in most major cities across the country.
  2. Vancouver zoning regulations required setbacks at the 10th and 15th floors, which you can see in this photo.
  3. A ghost lives here! Yes, known as the Lady in Red and thought to be the ghost of socialite, Jennie Pearl Cox… read more here!

CANADIAN NATIONAL SYSTEM, Canadian Railway

Given the enormity of the Canadian railway system in our history, I was thrilled to find a connection in the hanger collection. Do you think this hanger might trace back to here…

Rail Archive

 Or do you think it’s more likely to have traveled here?

eBay

Regardless of when or where this vintage wooden hanger hung a coat, it’s safe to say it played a role in time for what has become a rich piece of our Canadian tapestry.

JOHN BULLOCH LTD, Toronto ON

John Bulloch, an Irish immigrant to Canada, formed his business, Bulloch Tailors, in the Depression era, and was known for ‘CASH only’ sales, no credit, no trade!

Bulloch Tailors/Peter Bulloch

Bulloch was also known for his outrageous ads, often offending special interest groups by the tone and message of his adverts. In fact, according to his son Peter Bulloch, editorial advertising is credited to John Bulloch!

Bulloch Tailors specializes in custom made suits for men, and in their words, ‘Custom Tailors to Gentlemen’. Read more here.

Bulloch Tailors/Peter Bulloch

Interesting Facts:

  1. John Bulloch made full 5-piece made-to-measure uniforms for the Canadian officers during the war. But he didn’t make just any uniform. These uniforms were the best quality money could buy, and cost $200 – the same amount the government gave each officer for their military uniform! In this way John Bulloch did his part for the war effort, and at the same time created a following of satisfied officers who would in all probability stay with him after the war. Smart.
  2. Smart? Definitely. Read more here on how John Bulloch secured enough gold braid for the uniforms he tailored at a time when gold braid was in high demand, but a serious shortage was developing!

John Bulloch, Bulloch Tailors Ltd. Another iconic name in our Canadian history.

HILTON HOTELS, hotels ‘Around the World’

Well now. A Hilton hanger. And we all know Hilton stands for, ‘Hotels around the World’! Who knew a Hilton hanger would show up in the mix?

Back in 1925 Conrad Hilton opened the high-rise Dallas Hilton, the first hotel to carry the Hilton name.

Hilton Worldwide on Pinterest

What’s so interesting about this particular building is, since air conditioning hadn’t yet been invented, the building was designed so that no guest rooms faced the western sun. Instead, the elevators, laundry chutes, airshafts, and other non-customer facilities were placed on that side of the building. Conrad Hilton Sr. didn’t miss a beat, and if you watched Mad Men, you will see his son, Conrad Hilton Jr.’s character portrayed in a way that shows the Hilton legacy didn’t get there by chance!

From vintage wooden hangers to a glimpse into the closets where they came from…

I hope you enjoyed my take on how thrifting can turn a moment in time into a piece of history, and in this case, a hanger to hang it on!

It’s all about the stories, wouldn’t you agree?

Thank you for stopping by!

Photographs by Sheila Zeller unless otherwise stated.