DIY Modernist Vase: Inspired by West Germany Matte White Porcelain c. 1960s

So you love Mid-Century vases – modernist – matte white porcelain, Kaiser, made in Germany circa 1960s. Are you okay with the ‘look for less’ concept? I am. You know I love my authentic MCM pieces, but I couldn’t resist this DIY temptation any longer!

I bought this vase a million years ago when Superstore was a new phenomenon and I was enamored with a $7.00 price tag.

Faux MCM Vase - Before

I never really loved the colour, but at the time it fit my decor. Shhhhh, hush with the gasps!

Well, all that has changed. My less-than-a-look has turned into a look-for-less by using up part cans of spray paint, first a primer and then a gloss.

Faux MCM Vase - In Progress Collage

If I wasn’t using up paint I had on hand I probably would have opted for matte instead of gloss, but in the end the high gloss isn’t so bad.

Faux MCM Vase - After

What do you think?

This is how the transformation looks from all sides…

Faux MCM Vase - After - All Sides Collage

Gallery style.

And from a distance in context…

Faux MCM Vase - In Context

I didn’t go out and buy anything for this makeover, and it took me about an hour from start to finish – most of that time was spent ‘watching the paint dry’ as they say!

I know the lines may not be exactly classic Mid-Century, but I’m okay with that for this faux variation.

How about you? What knockoffs have you DIYed lately?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use! :-)

Mixing DIY and Vintage Glam for a Modern Vintage Look

The much anticipated VintAGEous Fair in Victoria has come and gone. It was a lot of fun and a successful day with a huge thank you to Sarah Rempel for her stellar organizing of the event, and to all the customers who stopped by!

In prepping for an event like this there is a lot of work that goes on behind the scenes, and for me one of the things I focus on is presentation. How am I going to maximize my space, feature a variety of pieces AND keep them safely on display? This time around I decided to have some fun juxtaposing a rustic vintage look with the vintage glam of Audrey Would! Do you remember these pallets I posted on Facebook and Instagram?

Pallets

A super big thank you goes out to Leigh Davies for parting with them! Leigh had a plan for the pallets, but passed them on to me instead putting her own project on hold! I’m guessing the pallets had something to do with Mid-Island Ink Depot,  ’the’ place to buy toner cartridges in the Cowichan Valley! Leigh is ‘Mrs. Ink’ in the mix of Chris and Leigh, Chris of course being Mr. Ink!

So the pallets…

I asked my Dad to turn them into rustic crates. My idea was to pack them with inventory selected for the fair, and then use them to display the pieces. When you’re in a limited footprint it’s important to utilize your vertical space, and in this case my footprint was a 6′ table, so I had to create my own verticle!

These are the first four crates. My Dad’s neighbour, Bryan came up with a few more pallets and that was enough for me to end up with seven crates!

DIY Crates from Pallets

I wanted reasonable gaps between each slat to allow a little light in. With presentation in mind I also toyed with giving each crate a sanding and watered down staining for a more weathered look, but decided to leave that for another time!

When I’m pulling inventory for a fair I always do a test-run set-up. I find this really helps me narrow down the pieces and once there, makes set-up go quickly and smoothly. In this case, because the crates are made with pallets, I had to figure out which ones ‘fit’ best together. They’re all ‘roughly’ the same, but some slats are a bit warped, others not perfectly square.

Here’s a little look at my ‘Operation Basement’ test-run! This is an 8′ table, so I’ve taped it off at 6′. The pieces off to the side are back-up pieces I selected to replace items as they sold.

Test-run Table Set-Up - VintAGEous Fair

Like any behind-the-scenes, you can see there’s a lot less glamour than meets the public eye! I think that’s part of the challenge – to envision each display regardless of its surroundings. At the fairs you have no control over the backdrop, so all you can do is focus on your own display.

Another thing I try to do is put out a good selection while still keeping it presented. Less is more as a general rule of thumb, but for fairs I pack more into the space than I normally would. I try to layer the pieces down and bring them out while staying focused on theme, visual interest and overall flow. I place sparkly pieces where they will catch and bounce the light, and with this display my hope was the pieces out front would draw the eye to what was displayed in the crates.

Display Collage

Remember I said you have no control over the backdrop of your space?

Display Set-Up - VintAGEous Fair

In this case my table was set up in the daycare area of the Fernwood Community Centre!

Another part of my presentation is to draw the eye up, and with this display I featured larger pieces with chrome, and stood a crystal tray behind the glasses for sparkle en mass! This is where having a sign also really helps!

Display Set-Up - VintAGEous Fair

Behind the sloped trim is actually an access ramp to the area, which worked well for where my table was placed. Everyone coming down the ramp was able to see my table, and I hope the shiny sign and sparkle of the pieces helped catch their eye!

Since the Oscars were hot on the heels of the fair, and by now you all know the inspiration behind ‘Audrey’, this was my center display.

Disply - Center Section - VintAGEous Fair

Audrey Hepburn with her Oscar for the leading role in Roman Holiday, her first Hollywood movie and first leading role! I featured the tall clear decanter with this display, because it reminded me of the Oscar Audrey is holding! Here Audrey is attending the 54th Oscars.

In keeping with the theme, this year we watched the 86th Oscars at home in vintage Audrey Would! style…

Audrey Would! - Vintage Pieces - 86th Oscars

  • Northern Divine caviar served in a classic bamboo stemmed coupe;
  • Prosecco in sleek vintage Czechoslovakian crystal coupes; and
  • Ceasar salad in the vintage Baribocraft bowls I featured here and here.

Simple and elegant at-home-chic. So much fun! There is something to be said for classic vintage, don’t you think?

If you weren’t able to attend the VintAGEous Fair, you will find many of the pieces I had there over at Audrey Would! I am working on listing more pieces for you to see, so  don’t hesitate to contact me if you are looking for something special, or saw a treasure you wished you’d picked up. I am always happy to help!

Thanks for stopping by!

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AudreyWould Web - Business Card - Smoke - Side 2-sz

Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please credit and link if you choose to use!

A Chic New Look With Country Chic Paint!

I thrifted this sad little table almost a year ago; you might remember this shot I shared back then of my rescue piece. The lamp, however, was SO left behind!

Leather Topped End Table 'Before'

Overall the table was in pretty rough shape, other than the leather top. When my daughter Kaleigh saw it she wanted to make it hers – after a DIY of course! ;-) She wanted it black, I wasn’t so sure, and she insisted the vintage knobs needed to go. Huh?

I found replacement vintage knobs at General Salvage early in the game.

Replacement Knobs

That’s basically where the DIY was left.

Fast forward to Country Chic Paint, a new quality chalk paint local to Duncan, and suddenly this table was front of mind!

Country Chic Paint (1)

With the leather top to consider, I wasn’t too keen on extra sanding and priming, and with this paint I could leave out both! Country Chic Paint requires little to no prep, has no VOCs, is near odorless and dries quickly. Bonus!! I think you know where I’m going with this.

One can of Liquorice coloured Country Chic Paint for the makeover!

Country Chic 'Liquorice' Chalk Paint

Before I could begin I had to do a little prep. Some gluing and repairs were needed where one spindle had broken away from the table base.

Leather Top End Table Repairs

And because the table was in such tough shape I actually did do some pre-sanding to smooth the rough patches and edges a little.

Leather Top End Table - Sanding Prep

The table also had a glossy finish on it,  so a light sanding helps the paint stick. Priming is actually recommended for certain surfaces like mahogany, but I opted out of the priming because of the darker colour it was being painted. I wasn’t worried about bleed through from resins in the wood, but I’ve had that misfortune in the past. More on that here!

I also protected the leather top by covering it with paper and taping it off. I made sure the paper went over the gold leaf tooling because I was worried the tape might pull the gold off.

Leather Top End Table - Tabletop Prep 2

The last thing I did was raise the table on pushpins. This is a great trick for painting right to the bottom of the legs!

Leather_Top_End_Table_-_Painting_Prep_2

I used a synthetic bristle paintbrush, and ended up cutting the handle off because it kept getting in the way of painting the lower shelf!

Leather Top Table Makeover - Synthetic Paint Brush

The paint was a dream to work with. It went on easily, dried quickly and no lumps were left behind. The best part… no sanding needed between coats!

Leather Top End Table - 1st & 2nd Coats Paint

I actually liked the look after the first coat – some of the original brown was peeking through, but Kaleigh wasn’t game. She also didn’t want me to do any distressing – one of the very things chalk paint is so awesome for! After the second coat I let the paint dry overnight, and then applied the finishing wax. All the waxes are made up of bees wax and other natural oils. No solvents!

I applied natural coloured wax first as a protective layer, and here you can see the waxy shine next to the unwaxed chalky surface.

Leather Top Table - Wax Coats

I used the antiquing wax for a second round because I wanted to tone down the black of the liquorice. The antiquing wax did the trick adding just the hint of brown I was hoping for. If you compare the bottom table image to the one above it you can see the difference.

One of the reasons for this tutorial is to demonstrate that chalk paint is versatile. It is commonly used for antiquing, distressing and giving pieces an aged look, but as you can see it is also great for a shiny finished look!

Here’s a look at the stages.

Before:

Leather Top Table Makeover - Before

Chalk Paint applied, but no wax:

Leather Top Table Makeover - In Progress - Chalk Paint Only

Antiquing wax applied and leather top treated with leather conditioner.

Leather Top Table - After 011

Notice how the liquorice colour pulls out the black tooling detail in the border and makes it pop?

Here’s a closer look…

Leather Top Table - After 076

In the lower left corner you can also see the brownish hue of the antiquing wax along the beveled edge of the table.

What do you think? Are you ready for a brandy??

Leather Top Table - After 074

Thank you Country Chic Paint for introducing me to your product!

And thank YOU for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use! :-)

 

DIY Gift Idea: Make A Golf Towel for Dad!

With Father’s Day coming up here’s a quick and easy DIY gift idea for dad! This comes fully endorsed by my own Dad, who golfs almost daily, and does not love regular golf towels. Why? Well, because he finds them too long, and a little too bulky.

This is what you’ll need:

  • Face Cloth(s), on the larger side (13×13), with woven band close to one edge
  • Eyelet Kit, 1/4″ size
  • Fabric marking pencil, scissors, hammer

Steps:

Your eyelet kit will provide complete installation instructions. I used DRITZ eyelets.

DRITZ Eyelet Kit

Installing Eyelet Instructions

Below are a few specific steps for the golf towel, which I expanded on from the above.

1. Mark the woven band of the face cloth in the corner for eyelet placement.

Marked Face Cloth for Eyelet Placement

Make sure you use the eyelet as the guide so you leave enough room for it along the edges.

2. Carefully snip the mark just large enough for the eyelet to push through.

Snipping Hole for Eyelet

You want the eyelet to fit snugly through the hole so the fabric doesn’t pull away when the eyelet is inserted.

Inserting Eyelet

Notice this is the back of the face cloth? The little eyelet teeth poking through are going to bend over, so you want that to happen on the back!

3. Install eyelet on a solid surface, and make sure surface is protected.

Inserting Eyelet

I placed a cloth over a brick on my table.

Follow the steps from the kit to complete the eyelet installation.

Steps to Inserting the Eyelet

Remember I mentioned the eyelet teeth in Step 2? The last image shows how they look after they are bent over.

And this is what the front looks like.

Installed Eyelets Right-Side-Up

Can you see how close each eyelet has been placed to the corner seams? I did this for two reasons:

  1. The seams provide extra strength for the fabric where the eyelets have been installed.
  2. Having the eyelets placed tightly in the corners leaves less fabric to get in the way of the hook that attaches the towel to the golf bag.

Note, I did not reinforce the area with interfacing where the eyelets were to go even though the instructions said to do this.

I made two towels for Dad so that when one is in the wash, the other is on his cart!

DIY Golf Towel Project

This project is so simple, and honestly takes no time at all. It took me longer to put this post together than it would have to do up 10 towels, no joke!

Are you creating gifts for your dad or your husband, or both? I’d love to hear about your projects.

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller

DIY Planter Makeover for Herbs & Garden Gnomes

Not too long ago I was given a hand-me-down planter with these little gnomes that hang off the sides. Now I know these guys are pretty cute, but I’m not so much into cutesy garden things. Don’t unfriend me for that!

Garden Gnomes

Okay, they’re actually kind of hard to resist with their mischievous little faces… they spell trouble, right? But, I still wasn’t convinced. I kept trying to decide where to feature this planter with these little guys, and then it all came together for me!

My friend Heather over at Grillfusion blog posted about her new little friend, a white garden gnome! Seeing the gnome in white changed everything! Thanks for showing me the way, Heather!

Here’s a look at what I did.

Painting Garden Gnomes

Poor, unsuspecting little guys! I painted the planter, too.

And then potted it up.

Sweet Marjoram…

Sweet Marjoram - Container Planting

Rosemary & Basil…

Rosemary & Basil - Container Planting

and Thyme.

Thyme - Container Planting

And look who popped up!

Basil - Container Planting

See what I mean about mischievous? How did he get in there??

And what’s this guy doing hanging around here?

White Garden Gnome

So bad. I knew they were trouble!

Garden Gnome Planter

I guess my planter of herbs is their new playground!

Herbs - Container Planting

I’m hoping the herbs will survive in this planter, but if not I’m game to move them and try something else!

How about you? Have you given herbs in a planter a try? And what about garden gnomes? Are they in or out at your home, or have you already unfriended me for that? ;-)

Today I’m linking up over at Satori Design to join Shauna and the gang for the outdoor extravaganza party. Why not pop over and check out what everyone else has been up to! And if you’re into potting up herbs, check out Shauna’s tutorial. She’s has a few great tricks to share!

Project featured over at Living Savvy. Thanks so much Tiffany!

Living Savvy

 Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller

Gifts for Mom with a Vintage DIY Twist!

With Mother’s Day right around the corner, I wanted to share a few simple gift ideas. DIY of course!

Each one has been created using this vintage upholstery webbing that I picked up from General Salvage.

Vintage Upholstery Webbing

Project #1 – Quick & Easy Planter

You’ll need the following supplies:

  • Large coffee can including plastic lid
  • Modge Podge fabric glue
  • Popsickle Stick to spread the glue
  • Ball of jute
  • Tape measure, marking pen & scissors
  • Upholstery webbing
  • Potting Soil
  • Plant of your choice

Steps to make the planter:

Upholstery Webbing DIY PlanterThings to note:

  1. When you cut the webbing, allow the length to overlap slightly. I discovered the webbing shrinks as it dries, so my ends pulled away from each other leaving a bit of a gap once it was dry.
  2. The Modge Podge will bleed through the webbing, so try to wipe it off as you go.
  3. Placing the lid on the bottom of the tin is for added protection against rust spots being left on surfaces where the planter will sit.

Last step… Plant it up!Vintage Upholstery Webbing Planters

I planted lavender, but you can plant up anything you wish. :-)

Webbing Upholstery DIY PlanterProject #2 – A Stand for Mom’s Magazines!

You’ll need these supplies:

  • Old knitting stand frame (you can usually thrift these)
  • Hardware for assembly (save the old, but you will probably need extra screws)
  • Doweling (you decide the thickness based on your frame, *images 5 & 6 below)
  • Wood stripping (3/4″ x 1/8″) *images 9-12 below
  • Paint (for frame and doweling)
  • Modge Podge
  • Upholstery Tacks *images 17 & 18 below
  • Chain (I repurposed chain, *images 13 & 14 below, from the moss basket hanger I used for my DIY Capiz Chandelier)
  • Decorative wood stripping, stained or painted (mine was repurposed from the knitting frame, *image 17)
  • Upholstery Webbing

Steps to make the magazine rack:

Webbing Upholstery to DIY Magazine Stand 600px

A few things to note at this stage:

  1. Checking that the doweling fits is really important; I actually sewed one of mine a smidgen too tight, and had to redo it. Imagine if the project was all finished except for sliding the doweling in!
  2. If you intend to paint your doweling, now is a good time for that.
  3. The reason you Modge Podge your webbing ends (*image 7) is you’ll be attaching it to the frame with screws (*image 9-11), and this reinforces the webbing.

This project is a little more involved, but still not a huge undertaking. The next set of steps are easier if you have a helping hand, a drill and some patience!

Upholstery Webbing to DIY Magazine Stand

The last step I took was to do a light black paint wash on the inside strips of the stand.

Upholstery Webbing to DIY Magazine Stand

And voila, an old knitting stand repurposed into a chic new magazine stand for Mom using vintage upholstery webbing !

DIY Magazine Stand - Upholstery Webbing

What do you think? Are either of these projects tempting to try?

My Mom taught me a lot about repurposing things. She was pretty amazing at taking something tired and old, and making it look like new. She didn’t hesitate to roll up her sleeves and tackle a project, and she was never daunted by the scope no matter how big or small. I’m grateful for the things she taught me, and I miss not being able to ask her ‘how to’ questions as I undertake my own projects. If she didn’t have an answer, it wasn’t long before she came up with one. That’s just the way my Mom was… I miss my Mom. Mom, this one’s for you! xoxo

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller

Guest Post by Jay Harris: Designer Drapery & DIY Tips to Install

Today I’m pleased to introduce my guest Jay Harris, a regular contributor to Home Depot’s blog and an ”on the floor” Home Depot sales associate.

Home Depot - Master LogoJay’s interests include providing tips to homeowners on exterior shutters and casement windows, and today Jay has a ton of great DIY tips for you on how to select and install window treatments. Settle in. You won’t want to skim. I know this is one post you’ll want to bookmark for all your future window treatment DIY needs!

Thanks so much for sharing on sZinteriors today, Jay!

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DIY Designer Drapery – ‘Wow!’ Window Treatments

One of the quickest (and least expensive) ways to update a room while adding color and personality is through swapping out your window treatments. At the same time, once you know how to install them yourself, you can keep them in place for a month or a year or a decade…it’s completely up to you!

White & Blue Panels, Blue Pompom Trim - HGTV (Sarah Richardson Design)

{via HGTV Blog | Sarah Richardson Design}

But the best part is when it comes to windows and window treatments, you don’t have to be a professional interior designer to decorate like one – all you need is a bit of creativity and a few insider secrets!

Here are just a few of the DIY tricks at your fingertips.

Material Matters

There are several things to keep in mind when choosing the right materials and designs for your window treatments.

Block Striped Drapes - Day Old News Blog (Mary McDonal Design)

 {via Day Old News Blog | Mary McDonald Inc. design}

Length
Long curtains create elegance and drama while shorter curtains are more informal and casual. Longer lengths are more appropriate in master bedrooms, formal dining rooms and living rooms whereas shorter curtains work well in other bedrooms, kitchens and less formal rooms.

Color
The darker the color or the more saturated the hue of a particular shade, the more formal the look. Darker colors will add more elegance and energy than neutrals. For example, even though they are both red, a rich burgundy is much more dramatic than a bright, cheery cherry.

Patterns
If you want to elongate a room, choose stripes in a vertical or diagonal pattern rather than horizontal lines. Additionally, if you choose a busy or intricate design for your windows, pay attention to the rest of the room’s décor and be sure to balance out your use of patterns in the remaining space.

Functional Fabrics and Lovely Layers
Silk, velvet and velour drapery creates luxurious and romantic ambiance. If you are going for “plush” and “pampered,” these upscale materials are just the thing!

Velvet Drapes - Elle Decor

 {via Elle Decor}

Organic cottons, linens and burlap exude natural beauty and bring some of the outdoors inside.

Floor-length Drapes - Canadian House & Home

 {via Canadian House & Home}

To create dimension and texture, consider layering a heavier fabric on the outside with a light-colored lining. The lining not only softens the look of a room, it also blocks harmful UV rays while allowing light to filter in.

Black-out Panels - Make It Love It Blog

 {via Make It Lovely & Love It Blog}

Finally, a great way to add drama, personality and whimsy to your window treatments is through the hardware. Use wooden rods and metallic finishes; couple them with elaborate crystal or fabric-wrapped finials. You can also add extra flair with elegant sashes and braided cord ties.

Brass Rod & Hardware - Nate Berkus

{Architectural Digest via MPLS St. Paul Magazine Blog | Nate Berkus design}

Installation Tips

Now that you know what to install, let’s focus on how to install it.

Tips for Hanging Curtains & Drapery - Home Tips For Women

{via Home Tips for Women}

Along with the appropriate hardware, installation kit and accompanying instructions, you’ll need a level, a screwdriver, a pencil for marking holes and a metal measuring tape (not cloth or a ruler). As always, measure twice, drill once!

Here are some basic tips to remember:

  • Measure all windows, even if they appear to be the same size!
  • Curtains and drapes are supported by a rod or bar – make sure it’s sturdy enough to support the weight of your chosen draperies.
  • When attaching screws, never use plastic drywall anchors (they will eventually fall out).
  • For traverse rods with rings (to connect the fabric and the bar), measure from the bottom of the rings to ensure the proper length.
  • Use draper’s rules: purchase fabric that is one and a half times the actual width of the window to allow for gathers and pleats.

For notes on installation placement, consider the following discussion.

Not Problems…Opportunities!

Rather than focusing on the negative aspects of your windows or surrounding room, highlight the positives and turn those problems into opportunities to show off your professional-grade home décor chops!

Here are a few of the most common fixes to “window problem areas” using tried-and-true optical illusions:

Small Windows
Solution: Instead of placing the window treatments or blinds inside the frame of the window’s casing, install them on the outside to create the appearance of larger windows. By creating a frame for the window on the outside, you give the eye more of a window “box” to look at, thereby making the entire window area seem larger.

Choppy Window-to-Wall/Ceiling Ratios
Solution: If you have shorter ceilings, windows that are placed at odd heights or tall, skinny windows, minimize the choppy look by installing floor to ceiling window treatments. By having long curtains, you have tricked the eye into focusing not on the uneven proportions of window-to-wall but rather on the smooth, elongated, elegant lines of the drapes. At the same time, the entire room looks larger!

Off-Center Windows
Solution: When you have windows that are not centered or are too far to one side on a wall, balance them out by off-setting the window treatments above them and around the sides. By doing this, you will necessarily have more surface area of the window covered on one side; however, by keeping the curtains evenly drawn, you will only see the center of the window behind them – not the 6 inches on one side and the 2 inches on the other.

Window Treatment Solutions for Awkward Window Placement - Dec-a-Porter Blog

 

{via Dec-a-Porter Blog}

By incorporating the above tips and tricks, the sky beyond your windows is the limit! What are some of your favorite design techniques that you have implemented yourself?

Guest Post: Decorating With Bottles Of All Sorts

Today I’m excited to introduce my guest, Mari from Arcadian Home! If you haven’t shopped Arcadian Home, you really need to pop over. There is inspiration and eye candy galore. Trust me, you won’t be disappointed!

Thanks so much for joining sZinteriors today, Mari!

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Hello, everyone! It’s wonderful to be here with you at sZinteriors with a guest post from Arcadian Home blog. It’s an awesome place to find lots of interior design inspiration including beautiful home decor ideas from oval wall mirrors to lovely lighting for the foyer and much more.

Today, we’re going to take a look at decorating with bottles of sorts. From clear glass to brilliant cobalt blue, the vintage bottle is at once versatile and charming as a collection or a single perfect piece. Please enjoy!

Thanks to Sheila for letting me stop by for a visit.

~ Mari

Bottles in Decor

Two large green bottles can be seen in a living room bookcase filled with antique books, coral, seashells and interesting found objects. Shelves are also a great place to display collections of smaller bottles.

Bottles in Decor

A white vintage mantle looks so pretty with a collection of green, blue and clear glass bottles—made even more interesting by choosing each bottle in a different size. It’s such a fresh look for spring or summer.

Bottles in Decor

Vintage medicine bottles and other drugstore-related boxes and containers line the shelves in this white kitchen. What a clever idea to create a little theme by displaying the medicine bottles just below the pharmacy sign!

Bottles in Decor

A collection of mostly pale blue vintage glass bottles looks pretty on a thick glass floating bathroom shelf. How cool is the idea to hang a framed photograph of a contemporary meets rustic bathroom in a vintage bath.

Bottles in Decor

Colorful glass bottles march along a shelf above a built-in desk in the living room of this newly renovated 100-year-old home. Modern pendant lights are hung above the dining table and in the living room.

Bottles in Decor

A large fat glass bottle is a perfect decorative object for this coastal living room dressed up in a watery blue and soft tan color palette.

Bottles in Decor

Blue green antique spritzer bottles draw the eye to the top of a rustic white paned-glass cabinet. Blue canning jars hold white tulips on the table. It’s a lovely combination that ties the room together nicely.

Bottles in Decor

An interesting mix of vintage and contemporary bottles is just right for this eclectic outdoor dining room. I would love to see twin Mid-Century buffet lamps on either end of this washed wood sideboard. Images 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8

What do you think of these bottle decor inspirations? Leave us your comments below and visit our blog for more home decor and lighting inspirations!

Bedroom Makeover Update

Well, I’ve been working away on our bedroom makeover (introduced here), until progress suddenly ground to a halt. A lot of the parts and pieces are collected, and some DIYing is underway, however this week I was bitten by a nasty cold… All.Week.Long. :-| So frustrating.

Here’s a little peek anyway.

This is part of the palette that was already in place, and won’t be changing (read more here, here, and here), so it became the jump-off.

Duvet, Drapes, Quilt Rack

You might remember an area rug was part of the new plan. These are the options within the rug budget that made the shortlist, and I’ve since chosen one.

Rug Potentials

Which one do you think I chose? I know, two very different textures, two very different looks!

And you might remember, I showed a long, low MCM dresser factored into the plan. Well, I kind of became a ‘Used Finds’ junkie, scouring the ads like a daily habit, week after week with little to no luck. And then finally one day, there it was!

Used Victoria - MCM Dresser, Mirror & Highboy

{Used Victoria}

A DIY option (at least for me), but definitely along the lines of what I had in mind. This came as a package deal with a mirror and a highboy, because the seller wouldn’t split the set apart. But for the price, it’s a deal that’s hard to beat since they are Honderich pieces c. 1960s, and nice thick walnut veneer.

TIP:

Did you know the veneer in older pieces is much thicker than now-a-days, therefore a better option to sand? And the base wood tends to be of a higher quality than what you get now. Something to keep in mind if you’re looking for a used find. I say, the older, the better!

Here’s a look at my workshop right now. Notice my other Used Find in the background? Hint: the doors are removed.

MCM Dressers & Cabinet Makeovers 033

Since so much of the space depends on the MCM dresser, I’ve been working on it first, even though I had the glass door cabinet before it.

The top is fully sanded and complete, and this is where I left off when the retched bug decided to take over. GRRRR. So frustrating. Oh, did I already say that?

MCM Dressers & Cabinet Makeovers 047

It feels like the cold is starting to break, so I’m hoping to get the sanding finished up this weekend. You can see I have the the finicky areas left, and I still have the drawer fronts to do. And I’m dying to get my hands on the other Used Finds cabinet, too! These pieces will have completely different finishes, and I can’t wait to get the pretty party started!

Are you working on any projects right now? Any makeovers to do?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller unless otherwise stated.

 

 

Tired of Ho-Humming Along!

Well, it’s been a pretty busy last few weeks over here at sZinteriors. For quite a while now I’ve been scouring the USED ads, thrifting my little heart out and just plain visioning in search of makeover pieces for my project ‘to do’!

Here’s a little heads up on what’s got my attention:

Floor Plan - Labelled Layout

Yah, I’ve had enough ho-humming along. Time to move out the pieces that aren’t working, and move in ones that will. This layout is what I have in mind. You can see from the floor plan, we don’t have a lot of options for furniture placement, but that’s okay. We don’t own this home, so will do with this space what we can do!

Here’s one piece that’s just come along…

Glass Door Cabinet - Used VictoriaAnd a look at it right-side up!

Solid Oak Glass Door Cabinet

It’s solid oak with old brass hardware. You can’t really see in this photo, but the bottom of the legs are wrapped in brass – dipping with the real thing!

I have plans for this piece. Oh yes I do! So today I swapped my vehicle to the good outdoors, and set up my workshop in its place to get started.

There will definitely be more to come, but I have to get on with the grunt work first. That would be sanding. I so don’t enjoy the sanding part!

What are your plans for the weekend? Doing anything fun?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photos courtesy of Used Victoria ad