A Chic New Look With Country Chic Paint!

I thrifted this sad little table almost a year ago; you might remember this shot I shared back then of my rescue piece. The lamp, however, was SO left behind!

Leather Topped End Table 'Before'

Overall the table was in pretty rough shape, other than the leather top. When my daughter Kaleigh saw it she wanted to make it hers – after a DIY of course! ;-) She wanted it black, I wasn’t so sure, and she insisted the vintage knobs needed to go. Huh?

I found replacement vintage knobs at General Salvage early in the game.

Replacement Knobs

That’s basically where the DIY was left.

Fast forward to Country Chic Paint, a new quality chalk paint local to Duncan, and suddenly this table was front of mind!

Country Chic Paint (1)

With the leather top to consider, I wasn’t too keen on extra sanding and priming, and with this paint I could leave out both! Country Chic Paint requires little to no prep, has no VOCs, is near odorless and dries quickly. Bonus!! I think you know where I’m going with this.

One can of Liquorice coloured Country Chic Paint for the makeover!

Country Chic 'Liquorice' Chalk Paint

Before I could begin I had to do a little prep. Some gluing and repairs were needed where one spindle had broken away from the table base.

Leather Top End Table Repairs

And because the table was in such tough shape I actually did do some pre-sanding to smooth the rough patches and edges a little.

Leather Top End Table - Sanding Prep

The table also had a glossy finish on it,  so a light sanding helps the paint stick. Priming is actually recommended for certain surfaces like mahogany, but I opted out of the priming because of the darker colour it was being painted. I wasn’t worried about bleed through from resins in the wood, but I’ve had that misfortune in the past. More on that here!

I also protected the leather top by covering it with paper and taping it off. I made sure the paper went over the gold leaf tooling because I was worried the tape might pull the gold off.

Leather Top End Table - Tabletop Prep 2

The last thing I did was raise the table on pushpins. This is a great trick for painting right to the bottom of the legs!

Leather_Top_End_Table_-_Painting_Prep_2

I used a synthetic bristle paintbrush, and ended up cutting the handle off because it kept getting in the way of painting the lower shelf!

Leather Top Table Makeover - Synthetic Paint Brush

The paint was a dream to work with. It went on easily, dried quickly and no lumps were left behind. The best part… no sanding needed between coats!

Leather Top End Table - 1st & 2nd Coats Paint

I actually liked the look after the first coat – some of the original brown was peeking through, but Kaleigh wasn’t game. She also didn’t want me to do any distressing – one of the very things chalk paint is so awesome for! After the second coat I let the paint dry overnight, and then applied the finishing wax. All the waxes are made up of bees wax and other natural oils. No solvents!

I applied natural coloured wax first as a protective layer, and here you can see the waxy shine next to the unwaxed chalky surface.

Leather Top Table - Wax Coats

I used the antiquing wax for a second round because I wanted to tone down the black of the liquorice. The antiquing wax did the trick adding just the hint of brown I was hoping for. If you compare the bottom table image to the one above it you can see the difference.

One of the reasons for this tutorial is to demonstrate that chalk paint is versatile. It is commonly used for antiquing, distressing and giving pieces an aged look, but as you can see it is also great for a shiny finished look!

Here’s a look at the stages.

Before:

Leather Top Table Makeover - Before

Chalk Paint applied, but no wax:

Leather Top Table Makeover - In Progress - Chalk Paint Only

Antiquing wax applied and leather top treated with leather conditioner.

Leather Top Table - After 011

Notice how the liquorice colour pulls out the black tooling detail in the border and makes it pop?

Here’s a closer look…

Leather Top Table - After 076

In the lower left corner you can also see the brownish hue of the antiquing wax along the beveled edge of the table.

What do you think? Are you ready for a brandy??

Leather Top Table - After 074

Thank you Country Chic Paint for introducing me to your product!

And thank YOU for stopping by!

Signature 100x47 b&w

Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use! :-)

 

Thrifting or a Scavenger Hunt? Collecting Apothecary Jars & Glass Canisters

I’ve been having some fun out treasure hunting looking for glass canisters and apothecary jars. My mission: to rework the pantry. It’s a work in progress as I make my rounds, but here’s a look at what I’ve found so far.

Two more small apothecaries for our Vancouver Island Salt Co. infused sea salts.

45g Apothecary Jars

Super stoked to find them, because these little jars, which I wrote about here, are perfect for a packet of sea salt.

And two Anchor Hocking bubble lid canisters, also seen in the background above.

Anchor Hocking Apothecary Canisters

These were found on separate outings, and both looked like they’d never been used! Love that.

Here’s the rest of the collection so far.

Thrifted Apothecary Jars & Glass Canisters

They are a mix of vintage and not so new. The small bubble lid apothecary is a thrifted IKEA jar, and the large canister with the glass handle was a mark down  buy from Winners. I think my favorite find is the ribbed Anchor Hocking jar. Sweet, right?

It’s fun to thrift without anything in mind, but I like having this little mission on my list, too. It turns the outing into a mini scavenger hunt!

How about you? Do you thrift, and what’s your plan of attack when you do?

Thanks for stopping by!

Signature 100x47 b&w

Photographs by Sheila Zeller

The Cycle of A Thrift!

How was your weekend? All-in-all ours was pretty darned good since we were able to capitalize on the bright spots in our mixed bag of weather!

Saturday we wandered through the Duncan Farmer’s Market, stopping in for a chat at some of our favorite stands. When we popped by Makaria Farm’s stand, little did I know a very cool story was about to emerge.

This is my friend Heather, and you might remember her from my earlier posts, here and here.

Heather - Makaria Farm

Heather McLeod, Makaria Farm

You see that little chalk board? We were together when Heather thrifted it back a few months ago. The perfect little stand. Small, fold-able  portable, well-made as in dove tail corners, solid wood well-made, and above all, farm stand functional. All that packed into one thrifted little find!

Where the cycle of a thrift comes in? One of Makaria Farm’s long-time customers and acquaintances happened to ask about the new addition, specifically, where Heather had gotten it. And when Heather said she thrifted it, the woman was able to pinpoint from where! What are the chances?

As it turns out, this little chalkboard had once belonged to her! And… she had originally acquired it on her own thrifting adventures many years ago!

Now, how coincidental is that?

I love this story. You just never know where a good thrift has been, or when you might see it again. And you can be sure, there’s a story behind every one! ;-)

Do you have any thrifting coincidences like this to share? What have you got planned for the week ahead? Any treasure seeking adventures calling your name?

Thanks for stopping by!

Signature 100x47 b&w

Photograph by Sheila Zeller

 

Guest Post by Meghan Plowman from The Orchard: Tips for Decorating with Vintage Finds

Good morning and welcome to a special guest post feature!

Today I am really excited to introduce Meghan Plowman, lifestyle photographer and author of The Orchard blog! Meghan and I became virtually acquainted in a really neat kind of way… Believe it or not, I know Meghan’s aunt, Barb Nugent. Now having an acquaintance in common may not seem so unusual, except that Meghan lives in Perth, Australia… and as you know, I live on the west coast of Canada! Who knew our worlds would touch in this way? And for those of you living in the Cowichan Valley, you might know Barb, too. She’s a volunteer and fundraising organizer extraordinaire for our local Hospice Society – did you attend the recent fashion show fundraiser Barb organized?

From one thrifting vintage lover to another, thank you so much Meghan for being my guest today, and thank you Barb for the introduction!

Signature 100x47 b&w

Hello readers! I am thrilled to be contributing to sZinteriors blog today. I’d like to share with you some images of my own styling work and some tips about decorating with vintage finds, and what to keep in mind when looking for items to decorate with.

I am a lifestyle photographer and stylist living and working in Perth, Western Australia. You can see more of the work I get up to over at The Orchard blog as well as my Facebook page.

I particularly love bringing a mix of items into my styling work and tend to lean upon my ever-growing props cupboard for inspiration and interesting additions to imagery. Quite often you’ll find me either in a vintage market or peeling through layers of verge side household piles!

This first example shows an image I was asked to put together that had a real Autumn story.

Autumn, Meghan Plowman Photograph

For the sake of putting together this vignette I brainstormed all of the things I love about Autumn including:

  • Cooking
  • Fallen leaves and spending time camping in nature
  • Hot drinks
  • Rustic, earthy colour and texture
  • Reading indoors

It’s my belief that you can find the perfect touches for little or next to no cost, sitting just outside your door or at your nearest thrift store. For example, I found the pine cone and leaves from my garden, used a bottle I found at a garage sale and a camping cup I managed to find on the side of the road.

Next, this Easter table setting was created to inspire readers to dress their table for the holiday.

Easter table, Meghan Plowman Photograph

My table was inspired by the florals, fruits and textures of the cooler months of Autumn (it’s Autumn here in the land of down under when we celebrate Easter!)

Some inexpensive and thrifty ideas for dressing a table for your next soiree:

  • Use butchers paper or left over fabric roll as a table runner
  •  Place brightly coloured fruits and vegetables as a centre piece or scattered along the centre of a table
  • Try a collection of glass jars in different heights and finishes for e.g. amber, frosted, textured, jars with labels or logos, grouped together with loose florals cut from the garden to create interest and an eclectic decoration.
  • Branches and twigs are an easy way to create height to a centre piece and act as a ‘tree’ for hanging decorations, name tags and sweets.
  • Add some quirkiness to your setting by adding a figurine or interesting knick knack. It will create a talking point for guests and makes things fun.

If you find yourself with a collection of seemingly unrelated finds that you are unsure what to do with, perhaps take a step back and look at what the items have in common visually, if anything.

  • Are they similar colours or textures?
  • Were they bought or found in the same location?
  • Do they tell a story, for e.g. are they items found at the beach or are they all travel mementos?
  • Can you create a visual story with the items?

The next two images show examples of how I grouped a mix of random, found objects together to create a story, one based on the idea of reading books in a cozy corner, the other a seaside tale. The reason these two work well is because I tied them together through their similar colour and textures.

Vintage Vignette, Meghan Plowman Photograph

Items I used for the first image:

  • A road side chair which we painted grey
  • A discarded old book with the pages carefully peeled away and taped to a wall to create a background texture
  • A stack of my favourite design books with the spines showing text
  • An ampersand gift tag to create drama and a focal point
  • A vintage camera –why not display your picture taking equipment?
  • A ball of garden twine, and
  • A favourite scarf

Vintage Vignette, Meghan Plowman Photograph

The second idea:

  • Thrift store found vases
  • Left over soft rope
  • Found twigs, feather and pine cones
  • Mixed teatowels and scraps of art canvas roll
  • Garlic peelings! – These create a lovely texture for still life
  • Scraps of fabric
  • Found bottles
  • Old book pages
  • Found sea urchin and shells

I hope I have given you a few ideas for decorating with old, found or simply scrap items you have lying around your home! I am a believer that beauty can be found in anything, it’s just keeping your eyes open to seeing it. I’d love to hear your ideas and feedback! I can be contacted through The Orchard blog.

Have Meghan’s tips enticed you to head out and see what treasures you can find? I bet you have a corner, a mantle, a wall, a porch, a __________ (you fill in the blank!) waiting to be freshly styled. I love the theme that it’s not necessarily what so much as how you choose to display your objects. Mixing up textures and telling a story is the key! If you get a chance, please pop over to The Orchard and introduce yourself! And if you check out Meghan’s Facebook page there’s a certain connection posted there to my post from yesterday! Do you think you can find it?  ;-)

Thank you once again Meghan, for sharing at sZinteriors today. :-)

Why Do I Love Vintage?

Why do I love vintage?

I attended an estate sale yesterday that was run by the family members, and as pieces were contemplated by those of us looking to buy, stories and memories were shared. I felt privileged to be in the midst, as it was clear the pieces for sale had seen many years of family love… and as each member shared another moment connected back to their treasures, the reasons that I love vintage were underscored for me.

Vintage pieces are the stories in peoples’ lives.

Vintage pieces have stood the test of time.

Mikasa Cera Stone Creamer by Jonas Roberts, c.1960s, D1800 Brown

Like this Mikasa Cera Stone creamer by Jonas Roberts, circa 1960s. 50-ish years this piece has been around, and it’s in perfect condition!

Vintage pieces have seen more than we’ll ever know.

Mikasa Cera Stone Creamers by Jonas Roberts, c.1960s, D1800 Brown

Like these three Mikasa Cera Stone creamers all lined up in a row. Each has lived a separate life, and yet somehow their paths have crossed to become a family of three. All are in mint condition. What are the chances after 50 some odd years in existence?

Vintage pieces come from their very own family.

Mikasa Cera Stone Cream & Sugar Sets by Jonas Roberts, c.1960s, D1800 Brown

They’ve traveled around, have stories to share, and some of their stories we’ll never know…

But as we bring vintage treasures into our own lives, we get to continue their legacy of ‘being’. And we get to build our own stories in to the tapestry of their past.

I’m sharing these thoughts with you, because of…

The Beauty

Yesterday I witnessed vintage treasures being lovingly moved on. It was a special moment in time that I won’t soon forget.

The Tragedy

And then a little later on I experienced a stark contrast to that. I was in a ‘shop’, the name I won’t disclose, where glassware was being cleared from the shelves, apparently destined for another ‘shop’. The glassware was a mix of vintage and not so new, and it was literally being tossed into a cart without care. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing… and more disturbing, what I was hearing. The sound of breaking, chipping glass. Why? It made me so sad that these unsuspecting pieces were being handled this way, that their chances for survival were so carelessly disregarded…

The Opportunity

We’ll never know why… but we do know there are great pieces out there waiting for a loving home. If you shop vintage, go find them before it’s too late! If you aren’t a vintage shopper, do you think you might want to give it a try?

These are just a few of the reasons why I love vintage!!! I hope you’re having a great weekend. Pop by tomorrow… I have a very special guest joining sZinteriors, and there just might be a connection to this post! ;-)

Thanks for stopping by!

Signature 100x47 b&w

Photographs by Sheila Zeller

Vintage Lowney’s Campfire Marshmallow Tin

Not too long ago on a thrifting round I spied a bright, cheerful tin hanging out with a bunch of old tools and things.

Vintage Lowney's Marshmallow Tin c1930-40s

Maybe it was the ‘Campfire’ label that suggested a fit, but to me it looked out of place among the rusty grit and grime of the others.

So I pulled it off the shelf to take a closer look.

Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval

Marshmallows. Who knew marshmallows once came in a tin? Along with a ‘Tested and Approved’ Good Housekeeping Institute seal of approval to boot! No wonder this tin didn’t belong in the grimy group!

A little digging confirmed the tin originated in Montreal, and was manufactured by Walter M. Lowney Co. Limited – as in Lowney’s the maker of all things candy, chocolates ‘n yummy, sweet treats! According to the Canadian Museum of Civilization this particular tin dates back to no earlier than 1930, and no later than 1940. I love it when dates are so precise!

Here’s another look at the sweet marshmallow tin.

Vintage Lowrey's Marshmallow Tin c.1930-40

I didn’t leave it behind, but I didn’t bring it home for me, either. My friend, Heather loves yellow, and was on the hunt for a cool, old tin so I decided to pass this one on to her. I figured orange was part of the happy yellow family, and the label more than made up for the rest!

Here’s how she utilized the tin.

Vintage Campfire Marshmallow Tin Sewing Box, c.1930-40

{Photo by Heather McLeod}

And this is the nice little note she sent with the photo above.

I LOVE my marshmallow tin. It fits all those awkward sewing supplies that don’t fit in my little tins (e.g. the one on the right), like fabric pens and tall stuff and scissors. I haven’t come close to filling it yet.

Thank you Sheila!!!

And this is what treasure seeking is all about. I love it when outings end like this!

Linking up here…

Junkin Joe

Between Naps on the Porch

Thanks for stopping by.

I hope you had a really great Easter weekend!

Signature 100x47 b&w

Photographs by Sheila Zeller unless otherwise stated.

What Does Treasure Hunting Look Like Anyway?

By now you know I love to get lost searching for treasures in tucked away places. And if you’re not into this, then I bet you’re wondering what a day of digging for gold really looks like, right?

Here’s a little run-down, a few tips before you set out:

1. Take your own bags.

Heather McLeod - Makaria Farm

Some thrift stores are starting to charge for their bags, and many rely on bags by donation. Why not save a bag – notice my friend Heather’s cloth bag slung over her shoulder?

2. Plan to pay with cash.

Cash Only Sign - Etsy - Cinda Shop

{via Etsy – Cinda Shop}

Some thrifting outlets will accept cash only; smaller bills and coin are best.

3. Keep handi-wipes and/or hand sanitizer with you – if you thrift you’ll know why!

Vintage Cannisters Turq&Blk $3

4. If you see something you love, buy it.

Angie's Fondue Pot Find

Like this vintage fondue pot my friend Angie pulled from a pile! If you wait, chances are it’ll be gone next time you’re in.

5. When in doubt, snap a quick photo.

Butt Ugly Mushroom Cookie Jar

Text it to your trusted voice of reason for a second opinion! There are times you’ll be glad you did, LOL! Heather pranked my poor, unsuspecting hubs – had him second guessing whether or not I was really serious about this keeper of a piece. Might be rare vintage afterall! ;-)

6. Know your prices.

Baribocraft Bowls Salad Side Bowls

I’m noticing a shift upward in the pricing, and that’s fair, but just beware that thifting isn’t always the bargain basement you’d think.  These are vintage Baribocraft bowls I just happened to spy, and I can tell you that I’ve seen them priced all across the board!

7. Practice the one-in, one out rule. Hand over a bag of donations along the way!

8. And last thing…

Dinner at the Noodle Box

Don’t forget to eat, and drink lots of water!

Treasure hunting can be so much fun… you just never know when or where you’ll find something cool and unique.

Like this vintage West Bend cake carrier, c. 1950s-60s. Pretty cool, huh?

Retro West Bend Cake Carrier

It caught my eye when I was spending the day with my Kelowna pal, Carol (The Design Pages and mastermind behind The Bright Box). Did you enter the Bright Box giveaway yet? Better hurry, there’s only a few hours left!

Happy hunting!

Signature 100x47 b&w

Photographs by Sheila Zeller unless otherwise indicated.

A New Life With A Pair of Shades!

All it takes is a new set of shades!

Remember these thrifted Mid-Century lamps from about a month ago?

Thrifted MCM Brass & Walnut Lamps

Don’t you just love their mismatched shades!

At first I had a hard time finding replacements, so the lamps sat on my buffet looking sad and half dressed, like this.

MCM Lamps on Buffet

Minus the ambiance and mood setting of the glaring overhead lights, of course!

When I finally came across a few options I thought might work, I tried these ones first. A sandy linen with threads of metallic gold and silver running through.

1 - Linen, Gold & Silver Metallic Shades - 11Tx13Bx9H

I liked these shades, but didn’t love them. Somehow they seemed too small, and just a little bit meh.

So then I tried these black drums.

Black Drum Shades 14Tx15Bx10H

I looove black shades, and really wanted these to be ‘the ones’. But somehow they weren’t working, even though the size was definitely much better than the first shades.

So then I tried the same shade in a warm white instead.

Warm White Shades 14Tx15Bx10H

And this one seemed to work better. To be sure, we lived with them for a few days just as is, and each day they grew on all of us a little more. I toyed  with adding some gold trim… even bought the trim. But somehow the lamps just wanted simplicity.

So we decided these shades were indeed ‘the ones’, as is, and removed the cellophane wrap. The brass of the lamps was buffed, and each walnut base was waxed.

Here’s a look at our thrifted lamps now!

MCM Brass & Wood Lamps

We are happy with they way the shades worked out, and love the glow our new lamps cast. The room feels warm, and our buffet a little more loved!

A few tips when finding replacement lamp shades:

  • Take your lamp with you to the store – I didn’t with these lamps, but it’s a lot easier to eliminate the shades that are all wrong if you do! 
  • For vintage lamps, research what their original shades might have looked like – even if you ultimately don’t like the style of the original shade, at least you can change it up with intention.
  • General rule of thumb for shade size diameter is no more than, no less than 2″ the height of the lamp base – that’s the measurement from the bottom of the lamp to where the electrical socket sits. Click here for more information.
  • Live with the shade for a bit. If it doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t. You’ll know if it’s right for you by the way you react when you round the corner and see it!
  • Make sure you know the return policy – if you can’t return or exchange the shade, don’t buy it. Shades are tricky, and look a lot different in context. Even if a shade looks great on your lamp in the store, it might not look great when you get it home.

From a thrifted find to a pair of lamps we’re totally loving in our home! And one more small ‘to do’ I can  check off the list. :-)

Thanks for stopping by!

Signature 100x47 b&w

Photographs by Sheila Zeller

The Macklemore Thift Shop Challenge: Catching Up & Playing Along!

Well… who knew? A Macklemore inspired thrift shop challenge! I caught YHL’s post just after my thrifting outing last week, and had big plans for today’s thrifting. Only the excursion was called off due to a nasty flu bug trying to swarm in. Instead, here’s what I’ve cobbled together from last week so I can play along!

The three things you need to do to play:

1. Go to a thrift store with $20 and take a picture…

Since there’s no pic of me holding $20 in front of the store… but $20 is my normal budget for a thrifting day, I mocked this up with the treasures we loaded up from our adventure. The checked things are mine! Notice the red tool box? It’s the one I just wrote about here and pinned here!

2. Spend your $20 any way you’d like and photograph your spoils…

  • $3 Dovetail Box (it has a great old burnished brass clasp on it!) – I’m thinking of stenciling the box to create a vintage inspired look-alike crate… still deciding.
  • $9 Wine Carboy – not sure just yet where this will end up, but I liked it, even though it’s kind of new!
  • $1 Hoop – this will go into a DIY project somewhere down the line.
  • $5 Vintage Tool Box (made by Climax, c. 1930s to 50s) – you can see what I did with it here!
And the table below. You saw it sitting up-side-down and circled in the first photo! It’s c. 1940s, and in desperate need of a redo. Plans are underway for that to happen, and some of the prep work has already begun since Kaleigh has put her dibs in on it!

But I’m kind of cheating to include the table in my $20, because I actually saw it three weeks ago, just didn’t buy it at the time. I kept thinking about it, so when we popped back to this thrift store last week and it was still there, well I decided to make it mine! I paid $20 for it, a little too much, I know, but it was one of those pieces that was calling me. Besides, I saved my $20 three weeks ago!

3. Find one item (or more) referenced in the song and snap a pic.

Well, I figured you might find a few of these things in grandma’s closet, and maybe, just maybe the leather boots would be in grandpa’s!

Even though I didn’t get to play completely by the rules, it was still fun to pull this together from our outing last week. Whew, good thing for phone pics, isn’t it? Like I said, who knew?

I’m linking up over at Young House Love...

You seriously need to pop over and check out all the other Macklemore inspired finds!

Thanks for stopping by!

Photos by Sheila Zeller 

 

Organizing My Sewing Stuff: A Blend of Gran’s Vintage & My Semi-New

I inherited my Gran’s sewing box years ago, and believe it or not, left everything in it. I’ve used a few things over the years, but have always just left it the way Gran had it. Well, maybe not exactly the way she had it… it’s a lot less orderly now!

And if you think this is bad, here’s a peek at the mish-mash of my own sewing box!

Enter the little red vintage tool box that inspired me to take charge of all this chaos.

Yes, this was a thrifting find from the other day, and for some reason I saw it becoming part of my sewing mix… even though this is what it looked like inside.

Some soaking, Goo-Gone, lots of elbow grease and a little steel wool took care of this, and then I lined the bottom with rubber shelf liner and red felt.

It’s actually this I was more worried about!

Sorting and organizing all the random contents of my sewing stuff along with my grandmother’s to become one! Eeeek. And getting better systems in place to boot.

My thread and bobbins were a tangled mess.

The idea behind this thread/bobbin caddy isn’t so bad, but it’s one of those organizers that doesn’t really work. I’ve moved my bobbins to this little case instead…

I still have to decide on storage for my thread. Do you have any favorite solutions to share?

And buttons. Who saves them in all these packages, anyway?

Well, that would be me! I’ve now sorted my buttons and separated them into little jars of darks, whites, metallics, mixed colours, and kid inspired!

My Gran made her own dresses, and she loooooved rick rack, seam binding and elastic. I wrote about a quilt she made here.

Did you notice the vintage labels with their vintage prices?

I corralled all the rick rack and seam binding into a small box, and placed it with the rest of my craft supplies.

No need for this factory supply to be kept in my sewing box, right?

I did put all Gran’s elastic into a pretty little box, and it along with some other things you saw on the table now live in the bottom of my sewing box.

I also sorted and organized more things from the table into the top tray of my sewing box, and this is what lives there now.

The pink seamstress tape belonged to my Gran along with the very burnished thimble beside it. The tape is only in feet and inches, and it’s so old I’m afraid it might crack and break if I handle it too much. I have two of my own, but there’s no way I want to part with Gran’s, so it gets to take up a cubby of its own! Hey, do you know of any DIY ideas where I could showcase this special tape instead?

Remember all those envelopes containing spare buttons? Here’s how I used some of them for my larger needles and pins.

They’re now tucked down a side compartment in one of the trays in the top of my sewing box.

And by now I bet you’re wondering where on earth the little red tool kit comes in.

Well, tools of course!

Between my Gran and I, we had a few tools of the sewing trade…

Believe it or not, the wooden handled tracing wheel, seam guide, and large seam ripper were mine in high school! Never mind, never mind – I said my stuff was ‘semi-new’!

Here’s something of Grannie’s I never had! A scissors sharpener.

Do they even make these anymore? The scissors you see are mine… would you dare use them to cut paper? No, my family doesn’t either ;-)

Anyway, I thought the little red tool box would be perfect for our sewing tools!

I slipped the sharp objects into the little leather pouch on the right, just to protect them and the red paint that’s still in tact!

Everything fit perfectly.

And the lid even closed! :-)

My Gran’s sewing box is empty now, and all our sewing things combined. You see, I have to do some minor repairs to it, because the screws that hold the hinges in place are really loose, and the drawers are pretty shaky when they’re pulled open.

In the meantime I will just enjoy it for the beautiful piece that it is. Well used, and well loved!

Do you craft or sew? What kind of organizational strategies do you use for all the ‘stuff’ that goes with it? Oh, and if you noticed the old Aspirin bottle in the first photo, pop by next week… I’ll show you some of the other treasures that kind of go with it!

So happy to be featured over at Junkin Joe’s! Thank you, Andrea :-)

and…

Published in the Home section of Savvy Stories over at Savvy Mom.

Thanks for stopping by!

Photographs by Sheila Zeller