Audrey Is Attending! Will We See You There?

Yes, it’s that time again and Audrey Would! will be there!

This year’s Victoria Vintage Expo is taking place on Friday and Saturday, September 26-27! Friday the doors open at 4:00 pm and are staying wide open for longer this year until 10:00 pm. Can we say, ‘excited much’?! On Saturday the doors open at 10:00 am and don’t close until 6:00 pm! Whew! I’m excited and I hope you are too! Will I see you there?

Victoria Vintage Expo 2014

So, I bet you are wondering what Audrey will feature this year? Well, I can tell you it will be more of the same, but this year there is a greater focus on the Art Deco era and all the Gatsby-like entertainment ware and paraphernalia that goes with it! So that means barware, tabletop pieces, and pretty much anything that sparkles and is Gatsby cool!

Here is a little glimpse of some vintage ‘Downton Abbey’ activity-inspired barware, but don’t worry, there is more sparkle and glam that is Gatsby-esque, too!

Glitz & Glam: After the Hunt

Drinkware
audreywould.com

Vintage bar tool
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Drinkware
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Bar tool
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Red shot glasses
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Wall art
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Fox hunting, pheasants and flasks! Fun, right?

What vintage treasures are you hoping to find? If you send me a message I might just have what you’re looking for, and will be sure to tuck those treasure aside!

Thanks for stopping by – I hope to see you at the Vintage Fair!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use.

Wabi-sabi: The Art of Imperfection

Wabi-sabi. What is it, and what does it mean?

Wabi-sabi is the Japanese art or aesthetic of accepting and appreciating the beauty of the imperfect. Three characteristics among many that make up the fundamental basis of wabi-sabi include simplicity, asymmetry, and asperity- roughness or irregularity of surface.

I tend to embrace the imperfect, because in the world of vintage there are many beautiful pieces which include some with small imperfections from their journey along the way. At Audrey I work hard to offer pristine vintage pieces, but you will find the odd perfectly imperfect treasure in the mix, which will be noted in the item’s details.

This image is the inspiration behind today’s post.

Wabi-sabi Dish

I love the unusual shape of this dish, and the cheerful little flowers. If you look closely you will see a pretty finish to the glaze… and if you look again you might notice a white spot on the front edge of the dish. This is an example of wabi-sabi. The white spot is actually a small chip. One could be disappointed about the chip, or choose to embrace the imperfection and appreciate the dish as a whole for its overall beauty.

I was not dining at home, I was enjoying a meal out. To be served my dessert in a chipped dish intrigued me, because as you can see it did not take away from the presentation, yet this confident move is not generally anticipated when dining out.

What’s your take on wabi-sabi. Would you embrace the chip of this dish, or would you be disappointed and tuck this dish away?

Thanks for stopping by!

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PS – the dessert is grilled pineapple up-side-down cake. Have you seen my latest HOUZZ picks?

Photograph by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use!

 

Basics for Entertaining Any Time, Any Day!

Just like keeping a pantry cupboard stocked with staples, there are a few things I believe you should have on hand for low-key entertaining. And by entertaining, I really do mean casual drop-ins, intimate gatherings, and just because!

  • Trays

Every cupboard needs at least one tray, and I recommend going with a classic in either silver or wood like this vintage Contempo Teak tray from Japan. Once you have this basic in place you can always add to and expand your options.

Contempo Teak Tray, Square, Black Enamel Back

 

  • Cheese Board

Whether you like cheese or not, let’s face it, cheese is a fundamental for almost every occasion. I bet your pantry is stocked with crackers, so take this one step further and add a cheese board to your cupboard essentials!

Karl Holmgaard Cheese Board & Glass Cover

This happens to be a 1950s-60s Mid-Century option made by Swedish  designer, Karl Holmberg. Yes, this would be a definite addition to your collection, but a vintage Baribocraft cheeseboard would be, too!

  • Condiment Utensils, aka Condiment Accompaniments

It’s all well and good to have great serving pieces, but don’t forget to add the finishing touch with out-of-the ordinary utensils like a few of the pieces in this wooden-handle vintage collection.

Wooden Handled Utensils (x4), Condiment Set
Included are a pair of sugar tongs, a medium-sized cocktail fork, cheese slicer and nutcrackers. Now, how much fun would setting out these pieces be?

  •  Teapot and Trimmings

Whether you drink tea or not, I bet you know others who do, and having a teapot on hand is a must.

Hornsea C&S & Tea Pot, Cobalt Blue

This vintage Hornsea trio makes a small adjustment to the standard t, s & c set, and has paired the sugar bowl with a milk pitcher instead. The pitcher is larger than a traditional creamer, which makes it a great piece to use for other purposes. I love this set!

  •  Salt, Pepper, Oil & Vinegar Dispensers

It goes without saying that at least one set of salt and pepper shakers is a predictable basic, but having a pair of oil and vinegar cruets is almost a second ‘must’.

Hornsea S&P, O&V Caddy, Cobalt Blue

Making your own vinaigrettes is such a nice way to dress a salad, and keeping the base ingredients handy ensures you will always be prepped. This 4-piece Hornsea set actually sits on a wooden tray. Pop over to the full listing to take a peek!

These are just a few of the basics, but if you would like to join me for a cup of tea, I bet we can come up with a few more!

The Basics...
What do you have in your cupboard that you wouldn’t want to live without?
Thanks for stopping by!
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Photographs and Polyvore Set by Sheila Zeller. Please credit and link if you choose to use!

Blueberry Summer Cocktail

I am really excited to share this blueberry cocktail recipe with you! My hubs loves to play with cocktail recipes, and he created this recipe from scratch – the base was a blueberry dessert wine made locally by Silverside Farm & Winery, and you know how I feel about working with local ingredients!

 

Silversides Blueberry Dessert Wine (2)

Blueberry Summer

Ingredients:

  • 4 parts Vodka
  • 2 parts Silverside Blueberry Dessert Wine
  • 1 part Triple Sec or Cointreau (Orange Liqueur)
  • 1 Orange Peel
  • 1 Orange Twist
  • 1 Small Handful Fresh Silverside Blueberries

Mix it up:

  1. Fill cocktail glass with ice, preferably a vintage glass from Audrey Would! ;-)
  2. Fill cocktail shaker 2/3 full with ice
  3. Measure in Vodka, Dessert Wine and Orange Liqueur
  4. Shake until ice-cold
  5. Strain (pour) over ice in glass
  6. Squeeze orange peel over cocktail to release essence
  7. Garnish with twist of orange and fresh blueberries

 Enjoy!

Silversides Blueberry Dessert Wine (3)

Hubs has called this cocktail, ‘Blueberry Summer’, and in a toast to Silverside, served it on a vintage silver coaster from Audrey Would!

I was the lucky sampler of this test run, and I have to tell you, it was really good – perfect for a hot, summer day! The blueberries were amazing, and they were also picked fresh from Silverside farm. If you are into fresh blueberries, definitely stop by the farm. You can buy them freshly picked when they are in season, and while you’re there you can pick up your blueberry dessert wine, too!

Thank you Silverside Farm & Winery for this cocktail inspiration!

Silversides Blueberry Dessert Wine (1)

And thank you Clemens for sharing the pilot run with me!

How about you? Do you like to make up your own cocktail recipes? Do you have a favourite recipe to share – we would love to give it a try, too!

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use!

Vintage Lemonade With A Twist!

A few posts back I mentioned the new-to-me world of Polyvore, and shared a few of the sets I had created. Well, since then the fine art of self-discipline has taken on a whole new dimension! That’s right, I would if I could, but it’s probably not a good idea to Poly all day is it?

In the spirit of summer, vintage and cocktails I created this set sticking to my belief that vintage is about celebrating the basics. Now how much more basic can you get than good, old fashioned lemonade… in this case, with a swing and a twist?

When Life Gives You Lemons...

Crystal pitcher
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With vintage I think it’s important to let the pieces tell the story, and be the nuance of their time.

How about you? Do you let vintage pieces tell their story, too?

Thanks for stopping by!

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PS – The story behind this set… it placed 3rd overall in the Polyvore contest: ‘Juice it up: Summery Drink Recipe!’. You can check out the other sets that were entered here, but first, pick up some lemons and mix up a whiskey lemonade cocktail to sip while you peruse! ;-)

 

Vintage Tumbler Caddy Set: All Crinkled Up!

Summer is definitely here – is anyone else melting?

This latest treasure find was just listed in Audrey Would! I am featuring it because it’s the perfect accessory for these crazy, hot days, and also because there is a little history behind the pattern name of the glasses.

GlassTumbler & Caddy Set, Anchor Hocking (2) 600

 

These glasses were made by Anchor Hocking in the mid-1960s. The pattern of this set is called Lido Glass, but the original pattern was introduced in 1959 as Milano Glass. Production of the Milano pattern spanned 1959 to 1963, and was only produced in Avocado Green and Crystal (clear).

Zanesville Mould Company, a new subsidiary of Anchor Hocking at the time, was assigned to making new Milano moulds to replace the old ones. As it turns out, the new moulds were quite different from the originals,  which resulted in the pattern name being changed to Lido Glass.

The two patterns are very similar, however the Milano pattern is more textured and the crinkle more defined. One way to tell a Lido piece from a Milano is that the Lido pattern does not extend right to the rim. Look closely at the glass below, and you will see a plain band around the rim where the pattern has stopped.

Tumbler & Caddy Set, Anchor Hocking (3) 600

Lido Glass, like Milano, was produced in Avocado Green and Crystal, but it was also produced in Honey Gold, Spicy Brown, Aquamarine, and Laser Blue.

Crinkle glassware was popular at the time, and there were other companies producing their variation of this prevalent pattern trend as well. Morgantown Glass Company was one, but their Crinkle line has a distinctly different look. The tumblers are less uniform, and the crinkle is not as pronounced. In order to respect copyright, I could not share an image with you, but this link will take you to one. Seneca Glass Company with their Driftwood Casual line was another, see image here.

So you can see it’s not always easy to tell one crinkle glass from the next, but now you have a few more tips to at least tell Milano and Lido apart from one another!

You know what I love most about this Lido crinkle glass set? It’s easy… just grab your caddy and go!

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please link and credit if you choose to use!

 

Elderflower Martini Vintage Style

What’s not to love about a martini? Any variation, any way, any style!

Have you ever tried the Elderflower martini? Enjoy this modern twist on the classic cocktail – so perfect for a summertime sip!

Elderflower Martini 697

Yes, you can find these martini glasses at Audrey Would!

Periwinkle Blue Martini Glasses

They really are that colour, and they really are that pretty! Cheers!!

Thanks for stopping by!

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Images:

(1) Created on Polyvore - Floral, Not Stirred! by audreywould featuring blue home accessories

(2) Photo by Sheila Zeller – please link and credit this post if you choose to use!

Happy July 4th to my American Friends!

Today is a day of celebration for my friends south of the border, and in honour of the day I wanted to pay tribute to an American icon!

July 4th 6660

 

Cheers! Wishing you all a great day!!

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Image created in Polyvore. Please credit to this link if you choose to use!

On Set. Can You Locate Audrey?

Happy Canada Day!

If you’ve been following along with my Pinterest pins, the odd Instagram or Facebook post, maybe a Tweet here and there, then you have probably seen the design boards I’ve been creating. You might have even noticed them popping up on my sidebar…

Like this one. Inspired for July 1st!

Summer BBQ Party - July 1st 600

This board was created on Polyvore. Are you familiar with Polyvore? If not, it is a social commerce website where members upload products into a shared product index and use them to create collages called ‘Sets’. Audrey Would! recently became a member, www.audreywould.polyvore.com, so I’ve been having some fun creating sets.

Polyvore has a wide range of groups you can belong to as a member, and there is a never-ending flow of contests you can enter your sets in. I have been creating sets for these contests, but mainly because the contests inspire me. You don’t have to enter a contest to create a set, but I like the framework and direction contests provide. It’s also really interesting to see what other people come up with for the same theme.

Here are a few samples of my contest sets.

This one required the use of a spiral staircase as part of the room.  The Daily Spiral - Home Office 600

This is the home office I wish I woke up to every day!

Each contest has random requirements, and ‘Back to Black’ was all about featuring your favorite styling with chalkboard decor!

Back to Black - Chalkboard Paint 600

I thought this was a perfect DIY tie-in, and seriously, how awesome are these ideas? I love the chair!

With my sets, I always incorporate at least one piece from Audrey Would! That’s half the fun of it, and sort of the point. I really enjoy coming up with different ways to feature Audrey pieces.

This is one of my favorite sets.

Ice Cream Sunday

 

I think it’s because I really love the hand blown Aseda crystal coupes made by the Swedish art glass company, Aseda Glasbruk, circa 1960s… meant for champagne, but don’t you think they make a great sherbet bowl or Sunday dish, too?

This next set was about creating a ‘His & Hers Bathroom’, and this one was just way too much fun to resist!

His & Hers Bathroom 600

Ladies, do you appreciate? Or maybe I should be asking, Gentlemen, can you relate? ;-)

And then there was creating a set with a quote as the criteria, and I knew just who to quote!

Audrey Quote 600

 

Love her!!

So now when you see my sets pop up, will you take a second look? Will you try to pick out which pieces came from Audrey Would!?

Happy Birthday Canada 600

 

I hope so!

And I hope you are having a fantastic Canada day!

Thanks for stopping by!

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All images are sets created by Sheila Zeller for Audrey Would! Please credit and link if you choose to use.

Vintage Metal Milk Crates Go Curbside!

No, it’s not what you might think? Sadly, we aren’t getting our milk delivered to our doorstep in old glass milk bottles carted in vintage metal crates… but we can wish!

It all started with a quick little thrift, and somehow I ended up with these!

Milk Crates (2)

The shop keeper was so great – he told me he remembered these crates from when he was just a kid. His family owned a corner store, and the milk used be delivered in crates like these. The one in the foreground is apparently older, he thought from at least the early 1950s. If you notice, the top and bottom are different than the ones in the background.

Here’s another look.

Milk Crates (4)

On the left are two crates, one stacked inside the other, and do you see the round ends at the top of each corner? Now check out the top of the lone 1950s crate. No round ends at its upper corners. According to the shop keeper, the stacked crates are from the mid1960s and were purposefully redesigned to better accommodate storage.

Here’s a bird’s-eye view of both vintage crate styles.

Milk Crates (1)

Can you see the bar sitting towards the inside  top of the left crate? The 1960s crates were designed with two bars opposite each other at the top. The purpose of the round ends I mentioned earlier was to enable the bars to slide, and this was so the crates could stack one inside of the other when empty.

If you look closely below, you’ll see a slight taper to the profile of the 1960s crates compared to the 1950s design. In this image you can also see how the bars slip in and out of place, and that when they narrow up they also dip lower. This creates a ridge for the top crate to sit down into.

Milk Crates (5)

Both styles of crates were designed to stack. The problem was transporting and storing them when they were empty. You see, the 1950s crates took up the same storage space whether empty or full, and were cumbersome to move.

With the improved 1960s design, not only did the crates stack better when full, but the sliding rods allowed them to stack inside of each other when empty making carting and storing a lot easier! The shop keeper told me storage was always a problem, especially with the 1950s style, and that any overflow of empty crates simply got left outside. Hmmm, can you tell?

Here’s how I’m using my vintage milk crates now…

Milk Crates Potted Up (1)

Milk Crates Potted Up

Milk Crates Potted Up (2)

Milk Crates Potted Up (4b)

The fun part of this story…

I fell in love with the 1950s crate on the spot, and really wanted a few more. But when I looked around all I could see were crates that had been painted black. Now I love my black, but in this case I love weathered and rusty more. It just so happens my friendly shop keeper had what I was looking for… he just had to fetch them from out behind his storage shed, grass, dirt and all! ;-) Love it!!

I do love rusty ‘old’ things, and if you missed it, I wrote about ‘that’ crush here!

How about you? For the love of vintage, do you prefer your pieces to be aged and old, or DIYed to look new?

Thanks for stopping by!

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Photographs by Sheila Zeller. Please credit and link if you choose to use! :-)